ring ouzel


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ring ouzel

n.
A migratory Eurasian songbird (Turdus torquatus), the male of which is black with a white crescent across the breast. Also called ouzel.

ring ouzel

n
(Animals) a European thrush, Turdus torquatus, common in rocky areas. The male has a blackish plumage with a white band around the neck and the female is brown
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ring ouzel - European thrush common in rocky areasring ouzel - European thrush common in rocky areas; the male has blackish plumage with a white band around the neck
thrush - songbirds characteristically having brownish upper plumage with a spotted breast
genus Turdus, Turdus - type genus of the Turdidae
References in periodicals archive ?
This fine picture of a male ring ouzel was taken by John Money at scaling dam.
Other birds in the area include meadow pipit, ring ouzel from Morocco, red and black grouse and occasionally the dotterel.
While lapwing, curlew, golden plover, ring ouzel, merlin and black grouse are in serious decline elsewhere, they can still be found in good numbers on our moors.
In 2012, a licensed bird ringer monitoring ring ouzel nests at Stanhope Moor discovered that three ring ouzel chicks in a nest had been 'close ringed'.
I came in search of ring ouzel, a rare mountain cousin of the common blackbird.
I came in search of ring ouzel, a rare mountain cousin of the I came in search of ring ouzel, a rare mountain cousin of the common blackbird.
Red grouse have declined 48% and four species - teal, peregrine, ring ouzel and black headed gull are now extinct in this area.
Wilfy Wells has excelled round this venue in the past and the 3 Steps To Glory finalist should make a bold bid for glory from what could be a good make-up clad in the stripes in the first of the 500m opens at 7.43pm, while in-form Ring Ouzel (7.58) and progressive pup Droopys Victor can boss their respective contests.
At first glance, the ring ouzel could be confused with a blackbird.
The ring ouzel is a member of which family of birds?