wind shake

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wind shake

 (wĭnd)
n.
A crack or separation between growth rings in timber, attributed to the straining of tree trunks in high winds.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wind shake

(wɪnd)
n
1. (Forestry) a crack between the annual rings in wood: caused by strong winds bending the tree trunk
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wind′ shake`

(wɪnd)
n.
a flaw in wood supposed to be caused by the action of strong winds upon the trunk of the tree.
[1535–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ring shake, the longitudinal separation of wood parallel to the growth rings, is one of the more serious problems affecting utilization of hemlock lumber.
The wood is coarse and uneven in texture, splinters when worked with tools, is prone to ring shake, and it has uneven moisture content, which causes problems in kiln-drying (Alden 1997).
Ring shake is one of the more serious problems affecting utilization of hemlock lumber (Gardner and Diebel 1996).
Koehler (1933) suggested that internal stresses caused by sudden changes in diameter growth rates, with emphasis on either greater circumferential growth than radial growth or a reduction in the turgidity of the older tissues, could account for ring shake. Meyer and Leney (1968) concluded that ring shake in western conifers was a naturally occurring defect in standing trees, resulting in a separation of contiguous latewood tracheids along the middle lamella, but could not isolate the causal factors.
The sample was selected so that all typical shapes of heart checks (I-, Y- and X-shaped cracks) and also ring shakes were included.
Because cracks mostly initiate from the pith and extend in a radial direction or, in the case of ring shakes, follow a circle around the pith, a polar coordinate system is ideal for defining the positions of control points.
For the ring shakes, points were set to discrete angles in steps of 20 degrees.
The third category is ring shakes. They are oriented tangential to and follow the structure of the annual rings.