rioting


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ri·ot

 (rī′ət)
n.
1. A wild or turbulent disturbance created by a large number of people.
2. Law A violent disturbance of the public peace by three or more persons assembled for a common purpose.
3. An unrestrained outbreak, as of laughter or passions.
4. A profusion: The garden was a riot of colors in August.
5.
a. Unrestrained merrymaking; revelry.
b. Debauchery.
6. Slang An irresistibly funny person or thing: Isn't she a riot?
v. ri·ot·ed, ri·ot·ing, ri·ots
v.intr.
1. To take part in a riot.
2. To live wildly or engage in uncontrolled revelry.
v.tr.
To waste (money or time) in wild or wanton living: "rioted his life out, and made an end" (Tennyson).

[Middle English, from Old French, dispute, from rioter, to quarrel, perhaps from ruire, to roar, from Latin rūgīre.]

ri′ot·er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rioting - a state of disorder involving group violencerioting - a state of disorder involving group violence
disorder - a disturbance of the peace or of public order
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

rioting

[ˈraɪətɪŋ] némeutes fpl
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

rioting

nKrawalle pl; (Pol also) → Aufstände pl; rioting in the streetsStraßenkrawalle or -schlachten pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
The peasants are rioting, and you can't manage them?
Indeed, she laughed, and said it was rather fun, "like something out of Sterne," --of such comfort is a literary reference in all seasons and circumstances,--and then she added, with a sweet look that sent the blood rioting about my heart, "It won't matter so much, will it, love, NOW?"
[*] During the rioting between the Cancellieri and Panciatichi factions in 1502 and 1503.
Our report shows that there seems to be a link between deprivation and rioting, that a lack of hopes and dreams amongst young people seems to make them feel that they have no stake in society and that the failure of basic values may have contributed to the situation.
It's easy to name a riot when there's a cause, like the race riots, or a place on which it was focused, like the Rhondda riots, or even a trade that is rioting.
More than300 people were detained or arrested in the rioting.
He describes rioting during the nineteenth century, including the Rum Rebellion and unrest during industrial disputes, such as the Maritime Strike of 1890; military and civil mutinies from 1885 to 1970 such as the New Zealand naval mutiny of 1947; and riots and assassinations and challenges to authority, including race and industrial riots, attacks on parliament, and terrorism.
A series of detailed city maps aid readers in identifying streets and neighborhoods where racial incidents and rioting took place.
Black women placed the safety of their children as their utmost concern during the rioting. Susan Reed, a washerwoman who resided on East 28th Street with her elderly mother and her two children, tried to protect her family from the violence.
Mary Whitehouse contacted the BBC at the time of Toxteth and begged them to consider the effects of their coverage on the spread of the rioting and they did later set up an inquiry, at a cost of pounds 500 and lasting less than a week, which concluded that the spread of the riots had nothing to do with television and everything to do with the way people were telephoning one another with news of the riots from pub to pub.
SIXTY-three people were indicted in the rioting over the fatal police shooting of an unarmed black man in Cincinnati this month.
Paul Gilje's book, Rioting in America, surveys a fascinating subject, the riot, over the entire course of British colonial and U.S.