rise to


Also found in: Idioms.

rise to

vb
(intr, preposition) to respond adequately to (the demands of something, esp a testing challenge)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Illinois (nonbinding, giving voters' opinion only), $8.25, would rise to $10
But Central Ayrshire MP Donohoe said it was right for the rise to go ahead, adding: "This is not an 11 per cent pay rise, it is a package that in the end will be cost-neutral.
In 2006, inflation rates may rise to above 5 percent in the United States if economic growth continues at current rates, even if the dollar holds its value.
Though there was an improvement towards the end of the year, growth of consumption of NR was slower than SR in 2004, causing the share of SR in rubber consumption to rise to 59.1%.
The slowdown in the growth of final demand had given rise to inventory buildups in some industries; in turn, the production cutbacks undertaken in response to those buildups were having a further damping effect on economic activity.
Housing starts averaged 1.189 million in 1992, and may rise to 1.216 million in 1993, representing gains of 17.1% and 2.3%, respectively.
Scientists expect that the lake will continue to swell for at least another month because most of the spring snowpack in the Wasatch Mountains has yet to melt, and northern Utah's rivers are already rushing with much more water than normal; the USGS predicts the waters will rise to 4,212.5 feet next month.
Rather, real interest rates will rise to the point that purely private borrowing is reduced sufficiently to allow the entire requirements of the federal on- and off-budget deficit, and all its collateral guarantees and mandated activities, to be met.