risible


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ris·i·ble

 (rĭz′ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Relating to laughter or used in eliciting laughter.
2. Eliciting laughter; ludicrous.
3. Capable of laughing or inclined to laugh.

[Late Latin rīsibilis, from Latin rīsus, past participle of rīdēre, to laugh.]

ris′i·bil′i·ty (-bĭl′ĭ-tē) n.
ris′i·bly adv.

risible

(ˈrɪzɪbəl)
adj
1. having a tendency to laugh
2. causing laughter; ridiculous
[C16: from Late Latin rīsibilis, from Latin rīdēre to laugh]
ˈrisibly adv

ris•i•ble

(ˈrɪz ə bəl)

adj.
1. causing or capable of causing laughter; laughable; ludicrous.
2. having the ability, disposition, or readiness to laugh.
3. pertaining to or connected with laughing.
[1550–60; < Late Latin rīsibilis that can laugh < Latin rīs(us), past participle of rīdēre to laugh]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.risible - arousing or provoking laughterrisible - arousing or provoking laughter; "an amusing film with a steady stream of pranks and pratfalls"; "an amusing fellow"; "a comic hat"; "a comical look of surprise"; "funny stories that made everybody laugh"; "a very funny writer"; "it would have been laughable if it hadn't hurt so much"; "a mirthful experience"; "risible courtroom antics"
humorous, humourous - full of or characterized by humor; "humorous stories"; "humorous cartoons"; "in a humorous vein"

risible

adjective (Formal) ridiculous, ludicrous, laughable, farcical, funny, amusing, absurd, hilarious, humorous, comical, droll, side-splitting, rib-tickling (informal) His claim is risible for its patent untruth.

risible

adjective
Translations

risible

[ˈrɪzɪbl] ADJrisible

risible

adj (liter: = laughable) → lächerlich, lachhaft
References in classic literature ?
The subject of these remarks was a slumbering figure, so muffled in shawl and cloak, that it would have been matter of impossibility to guess at its sex but for a brown beaver bonnet and green veil which ornamented the head, and which, having been crushed and flattened, for two hundred and fifty miles, in that particular angle of the vehicle from which the lady's snores now proceeded, presented an appearance sufficiently ludicrous to have moved less risible muscles than those of John Browdie's ruddy face.
There are jests which you would be ashamed to make yourself, and yet on the comic stage, or indeed in private, when you hear them, you are greatly amused by them, and are not at all disgusted at their unseemliness;-- the case of pity is repeated;--there is a principle in human nature which is disposed to raise a laugh, and this which you once restrained by reason, because you were afraid of being thought a buffoon, is now let out again; and having stimulated the risible faculty at the theatre, you are betrayed unconsciously to yourself into playing the comic poet at home.
He claims: "I often heard the 'No' mantra: 'We are too wee, too poor and too stupid to govern ourselves'." I doubt if any supporter of the Union has ever used this risible phrase which was first coined by John Swinney and is continually used as a straw man argument by the SNP.
This blatant attempt to rip up the Scotland Act in a doomed effort to shore up support for the Union is risible.
UNITED have risible centre-Ferguson upstairs Remarkably, nine of the Ajax squad members in Stockholm two years ago lined up against Juve in Turin.
IT was interesting to read that Anne-Marie Trevelyan MP thought the 'chloroform' threat she received from a fellow Tory MP (Delay to Brexit likely as no deal is ruled out', Journal, March 14) was 'utterly inappropriate' but she has made no similar comment on her own risible remarks that her constituents would be 'rioting on the streets' if Brexit was delayed.
But some of the dialogue is risible, and, overall, the opener came across as totally OTT.
The amateurishness of the Downing Street operation is beyond risible.
It has also revealed the terrible, risible state of the water industry.
But the acting is pretty dreadful across the board, led by another risible turn from a demented Nicolas Cage.
The latter, a much thinner booklet with a mouthful of a title, Kitab Mudhik dhawi l-dhawq wa-l-nizdm fi hall shadhara min kalam min ahl al-rif al-'awamm (The Book to Bring a Smile to the Lips of Devotees of Taste and Proper Style through the Decoding of a Sampling of the Verse of the Rural Rank and File, simply translated as "Risible Rhymes"), attributed to another virtually unknown poet from Upper Egypt and composed around the year 1058/1648, explores a potpourri of "rural" poetry.