rising rhythm

Related to rising rhythm: falling rhythm

rising rhythm

n.
A rhythmic pattern in which the stress falls on the last syllable of each foot, as in "They danced by the light of the moon" (Edward Lear). Also called ascending rhythm.

ris′ing rhythm′


n.
a prosodic pattern in which each metrical foot has one or more unaccented syllables preceding an accented syllable.
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With minds without fear and heads held high, their patriotic spirit used to soar at the march-past and hoisting of the tricolour amid the rising rhythm of national anthem, followed by patriotic speeches, songs and distribution of sweets.
I went of course with my prejudice, to which I also ascribe the authority of consensus, for rising rhythm. Admittedly ambiguous lines such as Blake's above, or the first three lines of his celebrated "Tyger," or half the lines in Shakespeare's "Full Fathom Five," were in every case coded as metrically iambic.
The increase in the weight of the re-exported goods as compared to last year was estimated at 12% reflecting the rising rhythm of re-exportation activity in value and quantity alike.
Rising rhythm results when the stress falls on the last syllable of each foot in a line, as in John Milton's line:
Counting a monosyllabic foot here would seem to normalize the scansion in terms of a rising rhythm. The strategy is troublesome, however.