risus sardonicus


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Related to risus sardonicus: tetanus
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risus sardonicus

(ˈriːsəs sɑːˈdɒnɪkəs)
n
(Pathology) pathol fixed contraction of the facial muscles resulting in a peculiar distorted grin, caused esp by tetanus. Also called: trismus cynicus
[C17: New Latin, literally: sardonic laugh]
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References in classic literature ?
Coupled with this distortion of the face, this Hippocratic smile, or 'risus sardonicus,' as the old writers called it, what conclusion would it suggest to your mind?"
Cohen, "Risus sardonicus," International Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol.
In some patient, "risus sardonicus" which is a continuous expression of smiling related with dystonia in the facial muscles may be observed.
Polyacetylenes from Sardinian Oenanthe fistulosa: A molecular clue to risus sardonicus. Journal of Natural Products 72: 962-965.
Erasmus' adage Risus Sardonicus, Joubert's Traite du Ris, and later treatises on the passions gloss the tense-lipped laughter of various Homeric characters as signs of bitterness, mockery, arrogance, or derision (Erasmus 1969, 11:5, 289-97; Joubert 1980, 88-89; Goclenius 1597, 26).
This pattern may be repeated several times, bringing about a tetanic spasm in which the chest is fixed, the neck stiffens, the face twists into a curious grin, the so-called risus sardonicus, and death brings the suffering to an end.
The impact on the facial muscles produces a particular characteristic feature called risus sardonicus, or "sardonic grin," in which the angles of the mouth are drawn down, exposing taught clenched teeth.