ritualism


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rit·u·al·ism

 (rĭch′o͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The practice or observance of religious ritual.
2. Insistence on or adherence to ritual.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ritualism

(ˈrɪtjʊəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) emphasis, esp exaggerated emphasis, on the importance of rites and ceremonies
2. (Other Non-Christian Religions) emphasis, esp exaggerated emphasis, on the importance of rites and ceremonies
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the study of rites and ceremonies, esp magical or religious ones
4. (Other Non-Christian Religions) the study of rites and ceremonies, esp magical or religious ones
ˈritualist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rit•u•al•ism

(ˈrɪtʃ u əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. adherence to ritual.
2. excessive fondness for ritual.
[1835–45]
rit′u•al•ist, n.
rit`u•al•is′tic, adj.
rit`u•al•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ritualism

ceremonialism. — ritualist, n.ritualistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ritualism - the study of religious or magical rites and ceremonies
cultural anthropology, social anthropology - the branch of anthropology that deals with human culture and society
2.ritualism - exaggerated emphasis on the importance of rites or ritualistic forms in worship
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ritualism

[ˈrɪtjʊəlɪzəm] Nritualismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ritualism

nRitualismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
In his column in this paper last Sunday, Randy David took note of the empty piece of theater that happened and described it as 'ritualism' - 'the act of going through the motions of expected behavior without actually believing in the goal that it is supposed to serve.'
Is the deployment state-led ritualism purely a Machiavellian ploy to legitimize a regime?
Consequently, I strongly believe also that there is no room for ritualism in Islam.
They were against idol worship, ritualism, blind faith and superstitions and discrimination based on caste, religion and gender.
But such faith need not be blind, otherwise, democracy becomes a dance of fools, and the electoral process sinks into erratic ritualism.
This has opened up a whole new world of sound for people who like to pore over music and feel the ritualism of it all.
As inconvenient as it may sound, the PTI cannot use bureaucratic ritualism to cloak its own shortcomings.
Problems are chasing Nigerians from every side; hunger, joblessness, kidnapping, educational decadence, ritualism, high level of corruption (which President Muhammadu Buhari has vowed to fight to infinity) and a host of others too numerous to mention.
While Volume 2 also addressed film reception within audiences, these particular films have garnered a near-religious following in unexpected or unintended ways--cult followings go beyond mere reception into ritualism, even abandoning traditional religion for the church of the cinema as adherents spend time and money in gathering in small communities to reinforce familiar narratives and morals.
Creedon concludes that the characters' ritualism within the plays is misplaced, as the works themselves mourn the loss of true myth and authenticity.
Special attention is paid to ideas of social ritualism, embodiment, and self-construction that the poet attached to food consumption and its rejection.
Drawing from the rich body of recent scholarship, the author situates The Scholars within the intellectual currents of the Yan Yuan-Li Gong school, Confucian ritualism, and the broader legacy of Gu Yanwu and Huang Zongxi on the one hand, and the specific socio-political context of the High Qing period on the other.