river red gum


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river red gum

n
(Plants) a large Australian red gum tree, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, growing along river banks
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.river red gum - somewhat crooked red gum tree growing chiefly along riversriver red gum - somewhat crooked red gum tree growing chiefly along rivers; has durable reddish lumber used in heavy construction
eucalypt, eucalyptus tree, eucalyptus - a tree of the genus Eucalyptus
eucalyptus gum, eucalyptus kino, red gum - reddish-brown dried gummy exudation from any of several trees of the genus Eucalyptus especially Eucalyptus camaldulensis
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mature River Red Gum woodland occurs inside and outside the exclosure, allowing comparison.
However, some of the difficulties in deciphering these early descriptions include the use of multiple common names for similar vegetation: Eucalyptus camaldulensis (river red gum) was called 'blue gum', Eucalyptus rostrata, 'Yarra' and 'flooded gums'.
Of particular note is Chapter 2 which investigates the healing potential of resins such as those that seep from the trunk of the River Red Gum; and Chapter 4, which considers the screening of native pines for their possible anti-cancer compounds.
Initial studies to provide an adequate water regime to a representative area of River Red Gum forest within the KPF that supports, or historically supported, a flood-dependent understorey found that we need to deliver >4000 ML/day for 3 consecutive spring months (Murray Irrigation Limited 2004).
The interior is constructed from River Red Gum wood (a type of eucalyptus) sourced from a local plantation, and rattan is used to fabricate the individual pods.
Around 225 km north of Melbourne, on the Murray River flood plain between Echuca and Tocumwal, lies one of Australia's ecological jewels--Barmah Forest, part of the world's largest river red gum forest.
"The rapid growth of eucalypts like the mountain ash, river red gum, and the Tasmanian blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) has caused them to be widely planted throughout the tropics and subtropics, both for timber and for fuel," said author Herbert Edlin in the "Illustrated Encyclopedia of Trees." He added that the various species have also been cultivated to provide railway fuel.
Some are ubiquitous, like the River Red Gum, which grows in every mainland state, while others are seldom seen, like the Wollemi Pine, restricted to a few remote gorges deep in the Blue Mountains.
It is about the historical ecology of the River Red Gum Eucalyptus camaldulensis, and thus considers the effects of historical events on this iconic species and across its broader landscape.
In 2010, 170,000 hectares of the iconic River Red Gum wetland forests along the Murray, Murrumbidgee and Lachlan rivers have been gazette as new reserves, including new Indigenous protected areas and joint management agreements for Traditional Owners.