rivers


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riv·er

 (rĭv′ər)
n.
1. Abbr. R. A large natural stream of water emptying into an ocean, lake, or other body of water and usually fed along its course by converging tributaries.
2. A stream or abundant flow: a river of tears.
3. The fifth and last of the community cards in various poker games, especially Texas hold'em.
tr.v. riv·ered, riv·er·ing, riv·ers
To win a hand in poker by beating (someone) on the basis of the last community card that is turned up.
Idiom:
up the river Slang
In or into prison.

[Middle English rivere, from Anglo-Norman, from Vulgar Latin *rīpāria, from Latin, feminine of rīpārius, of a bank, from rīpa, bank.]

Riv·ers

 (rĭv′ərz), Larry 1923-2002.
American artist whose complex paintings combine the bold brushwork of abstract expressionism with realistic images.

Rivers

(ˈrɪvəz)
n
(Placename) a state of S Nigeria, in the Niger river delta on the Gulf of Guinea. Capital: Port Harcourt. Pop: 5 185 400 (2006). Area: 11 077 sq km (4277 sq miles)

Riv•ers

(ˈrɪv ərz)

n.
Larry, born 1923, U.S. painter.

rivers

  • Mesopotamia - Translates to "area or country between two rivers"—the Tigris and the Euphrates.
  • potamology - The science of rivers.
  • fluminous, potamic - Two words meaning "pertaining to rivers" are fluminous and potamic.
  • watersmeet - A junction of two rivers.

Rivers

See also lakes; sea; water.

1. the gradual depositing by a river of earth and other material on the banks.
2. also called alluvium. the material deposited.
1. the formation of rivers.
2. a river system.
Obsolete, the state or condition of being muddy or turbid. — lutulent, adj.
an instrument used for measuring the increase in the level of the River Nile during its flood period, consisting of a water chamber containing a graduated pillar. Also niloscope.
the study of rivers. — potamologist, n. — potamological, adj.
a morbid fear of rivers.
a dweller on the bank of a river. — riparian, adj.
References in classic literature ?
Thompson had pushed on his course with great haste, calling at all the Indian villages in his march, presenting them with British flags, and even planting them at the forks of the rivers, proclaiming formally that he took possession of the country in the name of the king of Great Britain for the Northwest Company.
The same provident care for the deceased that prevails among the hunting tribes of the prairies is observable among the piscatory tribes of the rivers and sea-coast.
The merchant fishermen at the falls acted as middlemen or factors, and passed the objects of traffic, as it were, cross-handed; trading away part of the wares received from the mountain tribes to those of the rivers and plains, and vice versa: their packages of pounded salmon entered largely into the system of barter, and being carried off in opposite directions, found their way to the savage hunting camps far in the interior, and to the casual white traders who touched upon the coast.
We can imagine with what feelings of awe and admiration he must have contemplated the Wind River Sierra, or bed of mountains; that great fountainhead from whose springs, and lakes, and melted snows some of those mighty rivers take their rise, which wander over hundreds of miles of varied country and clime, and find their way to the opposite waves of the Atlantic and the Pacific.
Under the general name of Blackfeet are comprehended several tribes: such as the Surcies, the Peagans, the Blood Indians, and the Gros Ventres of the Prairies: who roam about the southern branches of the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers, together with some other tribes further north.
Magnificent scenery Wind River Mountains Treasury of waters A stray horse An Indian trail Trout streams The Great Green River Valley An alarm A band of trappers Fontenelle, his information Sufferings of thirst Encampment on the Seeds-ke- dee Strategy of rival traders Fortification of the camp The Blackfeet Banditti of the mountains Their character and habits
As she swam, her mind, filled with the terrors of the night, conjured recollection of the stories she had heard of the fierce crocodiles which infest certain of the rivers of Borneo.
The panglima Ninaka of the Signana Dyaks who manned Muda Saffir's war prahu saw his chief disappear beneath the swift waters of the river, but the word of command that would have sent the boat hurriedly back to pick up the swimmer was not given.
The river is not extraordinarily interesting between Streatley and Wallingford.
I like sitting in the boat and slowly rising out of the cool depths up into new reaches and fresh views; or sinking down, as it were, out of the world, and then waiting, while the gloomy gates creak, and the narrow strip of day-light between them widens till the fair smiling river lies full before you, and you push your little boat out from its brief prison on to the welcoming waters once again.
Wild horses would not drag from me the name of a certain river in the north whose narrow estuary is inhospitable and dangerous, and whose docks are like a nightmare of dreariness and misery.
For all my unkind comparisons to swans and backyards, it cannot be denied that each dock or group of docks along the north side of the river has its own individual attractiveness.

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