rivetingly


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Related to rivetingly: riveted

riv·et·ing

 (rĭv′ĭ-tĭng)
adj.
Wholly absorbing or engrossing one's attention; fascinating: a riveting science-fiction novel.

riv′et·ing·ly adv.

rivetingly

(ˈrɪvɪtɪŋlɪ)
adv
in a riveting manner
References in periodicals archive ?
Allen's narrative is well documented, written rivetingly for general readers.
Even though, or perhaps because of its extreme simplicity, coupled with the high definition of colors within a limited range, it was surprisingly rivetingly beautiful.
Kirkus wrote: "Disturbing, sometimes unsettling and ultimately offering a sliver of hope, this effort rivetingly captures the destructive effects of mental and physical illness on a likable, sweet-natured teen.
The side plot with his love interest, Chen's sister (Tang Wei), is less successful, but in both globe-trotting locales and cast, few movies have been as rivetingly East-West as "Blackhat,'' which soaks up the murky friend-enemy relationship between China and the U.
Secondly, the sight of Steve 'shaky hands' Strange being allowed near innocent people's earlobes with a pair of razorsharp steel blades was the kind of rivetingly tense TV that made Breaking Bad look like Babar The Elephant by comparison.
In doing so, she rivetingly employs a totally committed cast, led by Crissy Rock.
In this, she welds your eyeballs to the screen with a rivetingly ambiguous performance which skips from sincere victim of circumstance to imperious ice queen, constantly keeping you guessing about her.
The Lexus CT200h is interesting and unusual rather than rivetingly attractive.
The narrative might be Whig, but the history is fair--and rivetingly told" (back cover).
Rivetingly presented by former police detective Mark Williams-Thomas, the investigation found women willing to finally speak out after years of hurt about their abuse at the hands of Savile.
So tranquilized by art that usually really just is a lube job for showbiz, too few in attendance at the opening seemed to notice that the kits of celebritized pigeons--Maurizio Cattelan's stuffed, stool versions of which eavesdropped from various perches throughout the manse--were each choreographed, rivetingly, around a putrid puddle of sick; or seemed to heed the sage, candles, and incense burning in the metaphysical apothecary-cum-detox-center (the exhibition's second) immediately, ominously, to the right of the final exit, much less reach for one of the grimoires the artist placed above the fireplace, including Night Studio: A Memoir of Philip Guston, the first canto of the Srimad Bhagavatam, and Andrews' Diseases of the Skin (fourth edition).
But with two of the three protagonists of its romantic triangle under-characterized by the German-Canadian tenor Michael Koenig and the German soprano Gun-Brit Barkman and Malfitano's overall direction lacking focus, the rivetingly intense portrayal of the cuckolded husband by American bass-baritone Alan Held proved insufficient by itself to save Zemlinsky's day.