roam

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roam

 (rōm)
v. roamed, roam·ing, roams
v.intr.
1. To move about without purpose or plan; wander. See Synonyms at wander.
2. To turn the attention from one subject to another with little clarity or coherence of thought: I could hear the speaker, but my thoughts were roaming.
3.
a. To move or pass over the body: His hands roamed over her body.
b. To be directed without apparent purpose; look in an idle or casual manner: Her eyes roamed around the room.
4. To use a cell phone network outside of a home service area as defined by a service plan.
v.tr.
1. To wander over or through: roamed the streets.
2. To be directed over or around (an area): Her gaze roamed the beach.
n.
The act or an instance of roaming.

[Middle English romen.]

roam′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

roam

(rəʊm)
vb
to travel or walk about with no fixed purpose or direction; wander
n
the act of roaming
[C13: origin unknown]
ˈroamer n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

roam

(roʊm)

v.i.
1. to walk or travel without purpose or direction; ramble; wander.
v.t.
2. to wander over or through.
n.
3. an act or instance of roaming; a ramble.
[1300–50; Middle English romen; compare earlier ramen (Layamon), perhaps continuing Old English *rāmian < *raiman-, akin to Old Norse reimt haunted, reimuthr haunter]
roam′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

roam


Past participle: roamed
Gerund: roaming

Imperative
roam
roam
Present
I roam
you roam
he/she/it roams
we roam
you roam
they roam
Preterite
I roamed
you roamed
he/she/it roamed
we roamed
you roamed
they roamed
Present Continuous
I am roaming
you are roaming
he/she/it is roaming
we are roaming
you are roaming
they are roaming
Present Perfect
I have roamed
you have roamed
he/she/it has roamed
we have roamed
you have roamed
they have roamed
Past Continuous
I was roaming
you were roaming
he/she/it was roaming
we were roaming
you were roaming
they were roaming
Past Perfect
I had roamed
you had roamed
he/she/it had roamed
we had roamed
you had roamed
they had roamed
Future
I will roam
you will roam
he/she/it will roam
we will roam
you will roam
they will roam
Future Perfect
I will have roamed
you will have roamed
he/she/it will have roamed
we will have roamed
you will have roamed
they will have roamed
Future Continuous
I will be roaming
you will be roaming
he/she/it will be roaming
we will be roaming
you will be roaming
they will be roaming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been roaming
you have been roaming
he/she/it has been roaming
we have been roaming
you have been roaming
they have been roaming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been roaming
you will have been roaming
he/she/it will have been roaming
we will have been roaming
you will have been roaming
they will have been roaming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been roaming
you had been roaming
he/she/it had been roaming
we had been roaming
you had been roaming
they had been roaming
Conditional
I would roam
you would roam
he/she/it would roam
we would roam
you would roam
they would roam
Past Conditional
I would have roamed
you would have roamed
he/she/it would have roamed
we would have roamed
you would have roamed
they would have roamed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.roam - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employmentroam - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
maunder - wander aimlessly
gad, gallivant, jazz around - wander aimlessly in search of pleasure
drift, err, stray - wander from a direct course or at random; "The child strayed from the path and her parents lost sight of her"; "don't drift from the set course"
wander - go via an indirect route or at no set pace; "After dinner, we wandered into town"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

roam

verb wander, walk, range, travel, drift, stroll, stray, ramble, prowl, meander, rove, stravaig (Scot. & Northern English dialect), peregrinate They were encouraged not to let their cattle roam freely.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

roam

verb
To move about at random, especially over a wide area:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَطوف، يَجول
toulat se
flakke omkring
reika, flakka
klajūnas
klaiņotklejot
potepati se
aylak aylak dolaşmaksürtmek

roam

[rəʊm]
A. VT [+ streets etc] → rondar, vagar por
B. VI [person etc] → vagar, errar; [thoughts] → divagar
roam about roam around VI + ADVandar sin rumbo fijo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

roam

[ˈrəʊm]
vierrer, vagabonder
to roam free [animal] → se promener en liberté; [convicted criminal] → se promener en liberté
vt [+ world, countryside] → parcourir
to roam the streets [tourists] → se promener dans les rues; [gangs, thugs] → rôder dans les rues
roam around
vitraîner
vt fus [+ house] → errer dans; [+ neighbourhood, town] → traîner dans
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

roam

vt streets, countrysidewandern or ziehen durch; to roam the (seven) seasdie sieben Meere durchkreuzen; to roam the streets (child, dog) → (in den Straßen) herumstreunen; to roam the earth/worlddurch die Welt ziehen
vi(herum)wandern; (hum, hands) → wandern, sich verirren
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

roam

[rəʊm]
1. vt (streets) → vagabondare per, gironzolare per, vagare per
2. vi (person) → vagabondare, errare, gironzolare; (thoughts) → vagare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

roam

(rəum) verb
to walk about without any fixed plan or purpose; to wander. He roamed from town to town; He roamed (over) the hills.
ˈroamer noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Nearer to you, the smooth and unruffled surface is studded with little islands, where the mountain sheep roam in considerable numbers.
Some of them were dozing against the boles of trees, while others roamed about turning over bits of bark from beneath which they transferred the luscious grubs and beetles to their mouths.
"Wait a minute and I'll come right back," answered the old fellow, thinking he had to deal with one of those boys who love to roam around at night ringing people's bells while they are peacefully asleep.