romantic


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ro·man·tic

 (rō-măn′tĭk)
adj.
1. Having, showing, expressive of, or conducive to feelings of love or romance: met a romantic stranger; a café with a romantic atmosphere.
2.
a. Imaginative but impractical; visionary: romantic notions of turning downtown into a giant garden.
b. Not based on fact; idealized or fictitious: His memoirs were criticized as a romantic view of the past.
3. Of, relating to, or characteristic of artistic romance: the romantic exploits of the young hero.
4. often Romantic Of or characteristic of romanticism in the arts.
n.
1. A romantic person.
2. often Romantic A follower or adherent of romanticism.

[French romantique, from obsolete romant, romance, from Old French romans, romant-, romance; see romance.]

ro·man′ti·cal·ly adv.

romantic

(rəʊˈmæntɪk)
adj
1. of, relating to, imbued with, or characterized by romance
2. evoking or given to thoughts and feelings of love, esp idealized or sentimental love: a romantic woman; a romantic setting.
3. impractical, visionary, or idealistic: a romantic scheme.
4. often euphemistic imaginary or fictitious: a romantic account of one's war service.
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (often capital) of or relating to a movement in European art, music, and literature in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, characterized by an emphasis on feeling and content rather than order and form, on the sublime, supernatural, and exotic, and the free expression of the passions and individuality
6. (Art Terms) (often capital) of or relating to a movement in European art, music, and literature in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, characterized by an emphasis on feeling and content rather than order and form, on the sublime, supernatural, and exotic, and the free expression of the passions and individuality
7. (Classical Music) (often capital) of or relating to a movement in European art, music, and literature in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, characterized by an emphasis on feeling and content rather than order and form, on the sublime, supernatural, and exotic, and the free expression of the passions and individuality
n
8. a person who is romantic, as in being idealistic, amorous, or soulful
9. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a person whose tastes in art, literature, etc, lie mainly in romanticism; romanticist
10. (Art Terms) a person whose tastes in art, literature, etc, lie mainly in romanticism; romanticist
11. (Classical Music) a person whose tastes in art, literature, etc, lie mainly in romanticism; romanticist
12. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (often capital) a poet, composer, etc, of the romantic period or whose main inspiration or interest is romanticism
13. (Art Terms) (often capital) a poet, composer, etc, of the romantic period or whose main inspiration or interest is romanticism
14. (Classical Music) (often capital) a poet, composer, etc, of the romantic period or whose main inspiration or interest is romanticism
[C17: from French romantique, from obsolete romant story, romance, from Old French romans romance]
roˈmantically adv

ro•man•tic

(roʊˈmæn tɪk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to romance.
2. impractical or unrealistic; fanciful.
3. imbued with idealism, a desire for adventure, etc.
4. preoccupied with love or by the idealizing of love.
5. expressing love or strong affection.
6. ardent; passionate; fervent.
7. (often cap.) of or characteristic of a style of literature and art that subordinates form to content, encourages freedom of treatment, emphasizes imagination, emotion, and introspection, and often celebrates nature, the ordinary person, and freedom of the spirit (contrasted with classical).
8. of or pertaining to a musical style, esp. of the 19th century, marked by the free expression of imagination and emotion, virtuosic display, experimentation with form, and the adventurous development of orchestral and piano music and opera.
9. imaginary, fictitious, or fabulous.
10. noting the role of a suitor in a play about love: the romantic lead.
n.
11. a romantic person.
12. (often cap.) an adherent of Romanticism.
[1640–50; < Old French romant, taken as oblique form of romanz romance]
ro•man′ti•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.romantic - a soulful or amorous idealistromantic - a soulful or amorous idealist  
idealist, dreamer - someone guided more by ideals than by practical considerations
2.romantic - an artist of the Romantic Movement or someone influenced by Romanticism
artist, creative person - a person whose creative work shows sensitivity and imagination
Adj.1.romantic - belonging to or characteristic of Romanticism or the Romantic Movement in the arts; "romantic poetry"
2.romantic - expressive of or exciting sexual love or romanceromantic - expressive of or exciting sexual love or romance; "her amatory affairs"; "amorous glances"; "a romantic adventure"; "a romantic moonlight ride"
loving - feeling or showing love and affection; "loving parents"; "loving glances"
3.romantic - not sensible about practical matters; idealistic and unrealistic; "as quixotic as a restoration of medieval knighthood"; "a romantic disregard for money"; "a wild-eyed dream of a world state"
impractical - not practical; not workable or not given to practical matters; "refloating the ship proved impractical because of the expense"; "he is intelligent but too impractical for commercial work"; "an impractical solution"

romantic

adjective
1. loving, tender, passionate, fond, sentimental, sloppy (informal), amorous, mushy (informal), soppy (Brit. informal), lovey-dovey, icky (informal) They enjoyed a romantic dinner for two.
loving insensitive, unsentimental, unromantic, unloving, cold-hearted, unaffectionate, unimpassioned
2. idealistic, unrealistic, visionary, high-flown, impractical, dreamy, utopian, whimsical, quixotic, starry-eyed He has a romantic view of rural society.
idealistic practical, realistic
3. exciting, charming, fascinating, exotic, mysterious, colourful, glamorous, picturesque, nostalgic romantic images from travel brochures
exciting unexciting, uninspiring
noun
1. idealist, romancer, visionary, dreamer, utopian, Don Quixote, sentimentalist You're a hopeless romantic
Quotations
"Is not this the true romantic feeling - not to desire to escape life, but to prevent life from escaping you?" [Thomas Wolfe]

romantic

adjective
1. Affectedly or extravagantly emotional:
2. Not compatible with reality:
Translations
رُومانْسيّعاطِفيعاطِفي، غَراميغَرامي
romantickýmilostný
romantisk
romanttinen
romantičan
romantikus
rómantískur
ロマンチックな
로맨틱한
milostnýromantický
romantičen
romantisk
เกี่ยวกับเรื่องรักใคร่
romantikaşkla ilgilidüşselhayalî
lãng mạn

romantic

[rəʊˈmæntɪk]
A. ADJromántico
B. Nromántico/a m/f

Romantic

[rəʊˈmæntɪk] adj [movement, art, poets] → romantique

romantic

[rəʊˈmæntɪk] adj
[person] → romantique
I wish he were more romantic → J'aurais aimé qu'il soit plus romantique
[relationship, attachment] → romantique
[play, film, book] → romantique
[dinner, atmosphere, holiday, place] → romantique
(= unrealistic) [view, ideas] → romantique

romantic

adj (also Art, Liter, Mus: also Romantic) → romantisch; person alsoromantisch veranlagt; romantic comedyromantische Komödie; romantic novelLiebesroman m; the Romantic movementdie Romantik; they were very good friends but there was no romantic involvementsie waren sehr enge Freunde, aber sie hatten keine Liebesbeziehung; he played the romantic lead in several playser spielte in mehreren Stücken den romantischen Liebhaber
n (also Art, Liter, Mus: also Romantic) → Romantiker(in) m(f)

romantic

[rəʊˈmæntɪk] adj & nromantico/a

romance

(rəˈmans) noun
1. the relationship, actions etc of people who are in love. It was a beautiful romance, but it didn't last.
2. a story about such a relationship etc, especially one in which the people, events etc are more exciting etc than in normal life. She writes romances.
3. this kind of excitement. She felt her life was lacking in romance.
roˈmantic (-tik) adjective
1. (negative unromantic) (of a story) about people who are in love. a romantic novel.
2. causing or feeling love, especially the beautiful love described in a romance. Her husband is very romantic – he brings her flowers every day; romantic music.
3. too concerned with love and excitement. Her head is full of romantic notions.
roˈmantically adverb

romantic

رُومانْسيّ romantický romantisk romantisch ρομαντικός romántico romanttinen romantique romantičan romantico ロマンチックな 로맨틱한 romantisch romantisk romantyczny romântico романтический romantisk เกี่ยวกับเรื่องรักใคร่ romantik lãng mạn 浪漫的
References in classic literature ?
If they continued to sing like their great predecessor of romantic themes, they were drawn as by a kind of magnetic attraction into the Homeric style and manner of treatment, and became mere echoes of the Homeric voice: in a word, Homer had so completely exhausted the epic genre, that after him further efforts were doomed to be merely conventional.
But all at once, a propos of nothing, there would come a phase of scepticism and indifference (everything happened in phases to me), and I would laugh myself at my intolerance and fastidiousness, I would reproach myself with being romantic.
And if this is the accepted romantic programme--a duel over a girl, and the girl rushing into the arms of the winner--why, I shall not make a bigger ass of myself by going in for it.
I heard of him first in rather a romantic manner, from a lady who owes to him the happiness of her life.
I'd like it to end unhappily, because that would be so much more romantic.
Had they been strictly held to their one final and romantic object --that final and romantic object, too many would have turned from in disgust.
The estuary of the Thames is not beautiful; it has no noble features, no romantic grandeur of aspect, no smiling geniality; but it is wide open, spacious, inviting, hospitable at the first glance, with a strange air of mysteriousness which lingers about it to this very day.
That was all I knew of Nicolete's parents, and all I needed to know; with the exception of one good action,--at her urgent entreaty they had left Nicolete behind them, with no other safeguard than a charming young lady companion, whose fitness for her sacred duties consisted in a temperament hardly less romantic and whimsical than Nicolete's own.
He would never exactly reply to Philip's eager questioning, but with a merry, rather stupid laugh, hinted at a romantic amour; he quoted a few lines of Rossetti, and once showed Philip a sonnet in which passion and purple, pessimism and pathos, were packed together on the subject of a young lady called Trude.
Young Halpin was of a dreamy, indolent and rather romantic turn, somewhat more addicted to literature than law, the profession to which he was bred.
I am so fond of romantic things, and a graveyard full of buried hopes is about as romantic a thing as one can imagine isn't it?
No woman ever was really angry at a romantic marriage.