romanticism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ro·man·ti·cism

 (rō-măn′tĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. often Romanticism An artistic and intellectual movement originating in Europe in the late 1700s and characterized by a heightened interest in nature, emphasis on the individual's expression of emotion and imagination, departure from the attitudes and forms of classicism, and rebellion against established social rules and conventions.
2. Romantic quality or spirit in thought, expression, or action.

ro·man′ti·cist n.

romanticism

(rəʊˈmæntɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (often capital) the theory, practice, and style of the romantic art, music, and literature of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, usually opposed to classicism
2. (Art Terms) (often capital) the theory, practice, and style of the romantic art, music, and literature of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, usually opposed to classicism
3. (Classical Music) (often capital) the theory, practice, and style of the romantic art, music, and literature of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, usually opposed to classicism
4. romantic attitudes, ideals, or qualities
roˈmanticist n

ro•man•ti•cism

(roʊˈmæn təˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. romantic spirit or tendency.
2. (often cap.) the Romantic style or movement in literature and art, or adherence to its principles.
[1795–1805]
ro•man′ti•cist, n.

Romanticism

the reflection, in art, of a late 18th-century literary and philosophical movement in reaction against the intellectuality and rationality of Neo-Classicism. It produced no single artistic style or characteristic but strongly influenced the ideals of imagination, emotion, and the freedom of expression in other media. — Romanticist, n.
See also: Art

romanticism

1. A movement in European music of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, based on a revolt against classicism in favor of more imaginative, free, and picturesque modes and subject matter. It is characterized by the expression of emotions and interest in the sublime, as often represented by nature, and the exotic. It paralleled the Romantic movement in literature, from which it often borrowed themes and subjects.
2. (c 1780–1850) A mainly literary movement, romanticism was a reaction against neo-classical principles and the Industrial Revolution. Deriving inspiration from untamed nature, romanticism centered on the importance of individual feeling towards the natural world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.romanticism - impractical romantic ideals and attitudesromanticism - impractical romantic ideals and attitudes
idealism - impracticality by virtue of thinking of things in their ideal form rather than as they really are
2.Romanticism - a movement in literature and art during the late 18th and early 19th centuries that celebrated nature rather than civilization; "Romanticism valued imagination and emotion over rationality"
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
classicalism, classicism - a movement in literature and art during the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe that favored rationality and restraint and strict forms; "classicism often derived its models from the ancient Greeks and Romans"
3.romanticism - an exciting and mysterious quality (as of a heroic time or adventure)
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
stardust - a dreamy romantic or sentimental quality
Translations
romantičnostromantizam
ロマン主義

romanticism

[rəʊˈmæntɪsɪzəm] Nromanticismo m

romanticism

Romanticism [rəʊˈmæntɪsɪzəm] nromantisme m

romanticism

n (Art, Liter, Mus: also Romanticism) → Romantik f; his romanticismsein romantisches Wesen

romanticism

[rəʊˈmæntɪˌsɪzm] n (Art) → romanticismo
References in classic literature ?
It follows them from an earlier date and could not easily be changed, and it may serve to recall to an elder generation than this the time when their author was breaking so many lances in the great, forgotten war between Realism and Romanticism that the floor of the "Editor's Study" in Harper's Magazine was strewn with the embattled splinters.
The Realists, who were undoubtedly the masters of fiction in their passing generation, and who prevailed not only in France, but in Russia, in Scandinavia, in Spain, in Portugal, were overborne in all Anglo-Saxon countries by the innumerable hosts of Romanticism, who to this day possess the land; though still, whenever a young novelist does work instantly recognizable for its truth and beauty among us, he is seen and felt to have wrought in the spirit of Realism.
CLASSICISM AND ROMANTICISM. Two of the most important contrasting tendencies of style in the general sense are Classicism and Romanticism.
If Gringoire had lived in our day, what a fine middle course he would hold between classicism and romanticism!
Romanticism, which has helped to fill some dull blanks with love and knowledge, had not yet penetrated the times with its leaven and entered into everybody's food; it was fermenting still as a distinguishable vigorous enthusiasm in certain long-haired German artists at Rome, and the youth of other nations who worked or idled near them were sometimes caught in the spreading movement.
You have attempted to tinge it with romanticism, which produces much the same effect as if you worked a love-story or an elopement into the fifth proposition of Euclid."
I was fully convinced (the sense of reality, in spite of all my romanticism!) that they would all simply split their sides with laughter, and that the officer would not simply beat me, that is, without insulting me, but would certainly prod me in the back with his knee, kick me round the billiard- table, and only then perhaps have pity and drop me out of the window.
"Is your aunt's romanticism always consistent with accuracy?"
Von Sternberg was the Moltke of this War in the Air, but it was the curious hard romanticism of Prince Karl Albert that won over the hesitating Emperor to the scheme.
FOR Autumn-Winter 2019, MAC Cosmetics presents four beauty trends: Romanticism, modernism, art deco and suprematism, all anchored on the perfect canvas, which is smooth and glowing skin.
The Cyprus Symphony Orchestra is back with another couple of evenings of quality music incorporating a Tribute to German Romanticism, with works of important German Composers.
"Landscape Painting Now: From Pop Abstraction to New Romanticism" is the first study to take a global view of its subject, featuring more than eighty outstanding contemporary artists (both established and emerging) whose ages span seven decades and who hail from twenty-five different countries.