root cellar


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root cellar

n.
An underground pit or cellar, usually covered with earth, used for the storage of root crops and other vegetables.

root′ cel`lar


n.
a cellar, often underground and usu. covered with dirt, where root crops and other vegetables are stored.
[1815–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.root cellar - an excavation where root vegetables are stored
excavation - a hole in the ground made by excavating
storage space - the area in any structure that provides space for storage
References in periodicals archive ?
I went to meet them in August and was very impressed by the root cellar, which they'd built themselves.
If you plant all the root crops you'll need for the entire winter during the fall, you can use the cold ground to store the crops for you, rather than filling a root cellar with them.
Society secretary Susan Hutson said: "We are always looking for new ways to support the work we do as it takes much more than the money raised from members' subscriptions to enable the day-to-day running of the Root Cellar research room in Meltham and the society generally.
* Funds for Sullivan County to explore the feasibility of cheese and mushroom production at a root cellar located on the county farm
Stored in cool, dark "root cellar" (or refrigerated) conditions, they will last months.
Coleman also discusses creating a root cellar. Why root cellars?
In "Match In The Root Cellar: How You Can Spark A Peak Performance Culture", Chris McGoff allows you to journey along with Carolyn, a composite character based on real-life people, to learn and see how it's up to everyone to work through the struggles and find a way to redefine company culture and achieve peak performance.
But when her boyfriend, police officer Roelke McKenna, discovers long-buried human remains in the root cellar of an old Cornish cottage, Chloe reluctantly agrees to mine the historical record for answers.
A Transition approach to food could mean supporting local farmers who draw on sustainable growing methods like agroecology (an ecological approach to agriculture, viewing agricultural areas as ecosystems), or learning to grow your own food, or preserving seasonal produce or even building a community root cellar. The point, they say, is to invigorate a community and to connect people in a positive way in the face of the looming crises of climate change, resource scarcity, growing inequality and economic instability.
Some may recognize Chesman from her blog, Roots and Leaves; her association with Mother Earth News; and/or her many cookbooks, most recently The Pickled Pantry and Recipes from the Root Cellar. Chesman introduces the book simply by extolling the virtues of homesteading: saved money, glorious bounty, better food, self-sufficiency, community, a compelling sense of accomplishment and self-worth, greater variety, and a smaller carbon footprint.
And things only get worse from there: Shortly after this episode, the body of a young girl, perhaps twelve or thirteen years old, is discovered in a root cellar a short distance away, the body apparently having been there for several months.