rootball


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rootball

1. The roots and compost of a container-grown plant.
2. A technique for digging up a plant growing in soil so that the soil remains intact around its roots. Usually used for fibrous rooted conifers and other evergreens.
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A IT is always a good idea, especially on exposed sites, because wind can shake a plant causing the roots to snap and the rootball to lift out of the ground.
4 GIVE THEM A PICK-ME-UP While wilted poinsettias may have their lifespan reduced, soaking the rootball with warm water will often cause severely wilted poinsettias to revive.
April is probably the best time and plant a pot-grown one, with the top of the rootball level with the soil surface, training the stems out over the wall and tie them to a trellis or wall nails.
The less you disturb the rootball the better and plant in a well prepared hole with organic matter.
A small tree might be moved bare-root (no soil) or including a rootball (with soil).
Tie the sacking tightly around the rootball and lift the whole thing out, before giving it a good water.
Prepare the soil where the plant is to be moved to then dig up the plant, making sure that as much soil as possible remains around the rootball.
If the rootball of the plant is small enough, pull it through the wire from the outside.
Biologists have found that it's best to grind it down, then use herbicides to kill the rootball.
When planting, dig out a hole much larger than the roots, at least 30cm (1ft) wider than the rootball and 30cm (12in) deeper and mix in good garden compost and a generous sprinkling of slow-release fertiliser.