rootbound


Also found in: Thesaurus.

rootbound

(ˈruːtˌbaʊnd)
adj
(of a pot plant) having outgrown its pot, so that the roots are cramped and tangled

rootbound

Encircling roots at the bottom the rootball of a container-grown plant that indicate it has been left too long in too small a pot.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rootbound - (of a potted plant) grown too large for its container resulting in matting or tangling of the roots
planted - set in the soil for growth
2.rootbound - having the roots matted or densely tangled; "shaggy untended lawns of old trees and rootbound scented flowers and shrubs"- William Faulkner
tangled - in a confused mass; "pushed back her tangled hair"; "the tangled ropes"
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
"They only grow to a maximum of 12ft and are rootbound so they won't spread," she said.
Disadvantages associated with container-grown plants are that they may become overgrown and the plant may become rootbound, which can cause transplanting shock.
Rootbound (New Rivers Press 1998), was winner of the Minnesota Voices
The plant, by this time tightly rootbound, is carefully tapped out of its cup and buried about half way up its stem in this mound of loose dirt.
Jeanne Emmons' book of poetry, Rootbound (New Rivers Press,
When the plants have developed the five or more leaves they need to capture a fair amount of sunlight, and before becoming rootbound, they can be transplanted to their permanent sites.
Denz recommends planting palms in well-drained soil, taking care not to disturb the roots even if the plant is rootbound. Water deeply several times a month and feed with a palm-specific fertilizer in spring, summer, and fall.
Check container bottoms to make sure roots aren't growing out of them (which may mean plants are rootbound).
Avoid buying plants that have leggy stems, or lots of roots protruding through drain holes of the nursery pots--signs that the plants are probably rootbound and may perform poorly.
Don't buy leggy plants or ones that are overgrown and rootbound.
Start varieties from seed and transplant them when they have only two or three sets of leaves, or buy sixpacks of frisee and lettuces at a local nursery with a good selection (buy only young seedlings that aren't rootbound).