roothold

root·hold

 (ro͞ot′hōld′, ro͝ot′-)
n.
1. Support or stabilization of a plant in the soil through the spreading of its roots.
2. A place where a plant establishes a roothold.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

roothold

(ˈruːtˌhəʊld)
n
(Plants) the spreading of the roots in order to support a plant
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Top weed performers are typically generalists, capable of getting a roothold in disturbed environments, thriving under a diversity of conditions.
While mullein is not an endangered plant--the ultimate volunteer, it can get a roothold anywhere, including sidewalk cracks--some popular herbs are.
This will allow young native trees such as oak, ash or beech to reclaim a roothold in the woods.
"Blackberry": Dew-licked,/teetering & ripe,//crypts plumped up/with bright drizzle,//this purple-witted seed-star,/earth-lodged & lonesome,//old prophet once pleasure-shy,/now aching in thornlight,//sway, roothold, desire//whipped fast with impulse,//hands reaching, ripping, riddling--all/to bring the old sweet trinket home.
"Blackberry": Dew-licked, /teetering & ripe,//crypts plumped up/with bright drizzle,//this purple-witted seed-star, /earth-lodged & lonesome,//old prophet once pleasure-shy,/now aching in thornlight,//sway, roothold, desire//whipped fast with impulse,//hands reaching, ripping, riddling--all/to bring the old sweet trinket home.
If you allow them to gain a roothold, future battles will be fought to contain them.
No stranger to extremes, whitebarks inhabit high-altitude environments near timberline, where other tree species find it difficult to establish a roothold.
Without regular burns, other ground covers such as sage, bear clover, and manzanita got a roothold, along with seedlings of pines and shade-tolerant trees such as white, grand, and interior Douglas firs.
This height (about 24 inches) is ideal for sitting, and since there is little room in the beds for weeds, only the most tenacious find a "roothold." Other materials that can be used to build beds include bricks, concrete blocks, logs, planks, landscaping timbers and sawmill slabs.