rope-a-dope


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rope-a-dope

 (rōp′ə-dōp′)
adj.
1. Relating to or being a strategy in boxing in which one fighter covers up and often leans back against the ropes to allow the opponent to become exhausted by throwing punches so that the opponent cannot defend effectively late in the fight and is thus defeated.
2. Relating to or being a strategy in which one behaves passively or with little aggression until an opportune moment arises for successful action.
n.
A rope-a-dope strategy or course of action.

[Coined by Muhammad Ali in reference to his strategy in defeating the younger George Foreman for the heavyweight title in 1974.]

rope-a-dope

n
(Boxing)
a. a method of tiring out a boxing opponent by pretending to be trapped on the ropes while the opponent expends energy on punches that are blocked
b. (as modifier): rope-a-dope strategy.
[C20: coined by Muhammad Ali]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rope-a-dope - a boxing tactic: pretending to be trapped against the ropes while your opponent wears himself out throwing punches
boxing, pugilism, fisticuffs - fighting with the fists
References in periodicals archive ?
| Having performed his 'rope-a-dope' trick since round two, Ali came off the ropes and knocked Foreman out in the eighth round.
The offences run into millions, with Viagogo's rope-a-dope misdescriptions and omissions in information combining with stunts to create a false idea that the ticket supply is about to dry up.
How else were Real supposed to make sense of the fact that they had their heavyweight opponents on the ropes for long periods yet a rope-a-dope that Ali would've been proud of got Barca to the final whistle unscathed?
Discovering whether Elliott has punched himself out in the way that George Foreman did when Muhammad Ali deployed his exalted rope-a-dope tactics during the Rumble in the Jungle is going to be something to behold, as there is a no-holds-barred dynamic to this that will make for a compelling ringside spectacle.
To illustrate his point, he recalls how Ali overcame Foreman in the eighth round of their heavyweight showdown in Zaire in 1974 by using 'rope-a-dope' tactics.
The United Nations Security Council, with all of its strength and power, is now being challenged by a diplomatic rope-a-dope, directed to evil ends by a scheming practitioner.
Ali's use of 'rope-a-dope' tactics - where he would lean on the ropes and absorb punishment, as he did against George Foreman - saw him take a lot of head punches in the last decade of his professional days.
It was the fight that put rocket booster on Ali's legend when fans hailed his "rope-a-dope" tactic - on the ropes, luring Foreman into an energy-sapping barrage of punches, leaving him too tired and weak to dodge a knockout blow in the eighth round.
Ali eighth-round KO v George Foreman, Kinshasa 1974 To the disbelief of all observers Ali opted to play "rope-a-dope" with the fearsome Foreman, lolling back on the ropes and inviting punishment.
For round after round, Ali covered up in the ropes - a tactic soon to be immortalised as 'Rope-a-dope' - allowing Foreman to pummel away, gradually using up his reserves of energy in the process.
There are better written accounts of the Rumble in the Jungle, the Ali v Foreman bout contested in Zaire, for which both men received $5 million, when Ali adopted his 'rope-a-dope' tactic, knocking his opponent out in the eighth round.
John Carver spoke of trying to add an attacking edge to Newcastle to prove himself worthy of succeeding Alan Pardew, but now he finds himself in desperate need of a touch of the disciplined, no frills rope-a-dope tactics his former boss had some success with.