rose mallow

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rose mallow

n.
Any of several hibiscuses having large pink or white flowers, especially Hibiscus moscheutos, native to eastern North American wetlands and widely cultivated as an ornamental.

rose mallow

n
1. (Plants) Also called (US and Canadian): marsh mallow any of several malvaceous marsh plants of the genus Hibiscus, such as H. moscheutos, of E North America, having pink or white flowers and downy leaves
2. (Plants) US another name for the hollyhock

rose′ mal`low


n.
any of several plants of the genus Hibiscus, of the mallow family, having rose-colored flowers.
[1725–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rose mallow - showy shrub of salt marshes of the eastern United States having large rose-colored flowersrose mallow - showy shrub of salt marshes of the eastern United States having large rose-colored flowers
hibiscus - any plant of the genus Hibiscus
2.rose mallow - plant with terminal racemes of showy white to pink or purple flowersrose mallow - plant with terminal racemes of showy white to pink or purple flowers; the English cottage garden hollyhock
Alcea, genus Alcea - genus of erect herbs of the Middle East having showy flowers: hollyhocks; in some classification systems synonymous with genus Althaea
hollyhock - any of various tall plants of the genus Alcea; native to the Middle East but widely naturalized and cultivated for its very large variously colored flowers
References in classic literature ?
The pink bee-bush stood tall along the sandy roadsides, and the cone-flowers and rose mallow grew everywhere.
The variety of flowers include Tulip Lust, Daffodils, Oxeye Daisies, Dianthuses, Thymes Oxeye daisies, Daylilies, Dianthuses, Pink Evening Primroses azaleas, Irises, Rose mallows, Shamrocks, Hyacinths, Snowflakes, Violets, Columbine, lotus, marigold, rose, bougainvillea, orchid, Pensy, Phalaenopsis, Rudbeckia Fulgida, hyancyth, Cernedia, Butter cup, Daisy and others.
2003, before flowering began, 60 multi-stemmed plants were haphazardly chosen along a meandering path through a region of the marsh that was densely occupied by rose mallows, and five stems per plant were chosen without regard to the developmental stage of the buds, except that non-flowering stems were excluded.