tendinitis

(redirected from rotator cuff tendinitis)
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Related to rotator cuff tendinitis: frozen shoulder

ten·di·ni·tis

also ten·do·ni·tis  (tĕn′də-nī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of a tendon.

[New Latin tendō-, tendin-, tendon; see tendinous + -itis.]

tendinitis

(ˌtɛndəˈnaɪtɪs) or

tendonitis

n
(Pathology) inflammation of a tendon

ten•di•ni•tis

or ten•do•ni•tis

(ˌtɛn dəˈnaɪ tɪs)

n.
inflammation of a tendon.
[1895–1900; < New Latin tendin- (see tendinous) + -itis]

tendinitis

The inflammation of tendons. It can be caused by overuse of a muscle or group of muscles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tendinitis - inflammation of a tendon
inflammation, redness, rubor - a response of body tissues to injury or irritation; characterized by pain and swelling and redness and heat
lateral epicondylitis, lateral humeral epicondylitis, tennis elbow - painful inflammation of the tendon at the outer border of the elbow resulting from overuse of lower arm muscles (as in twisting of the hand)
tendonous synovitis, tendosynovitis, tenosynovitis - inflammation of a tendon and its enveloping sheath
Translations
jännetulehdus
zapalenie ścięgien

tendinitis

n tendinitis f; calcific — tendinitis calcificante
References in periodicals archive ?
It encompasses a spectrum of sub acromial space pathologies including partial thickness rotator cuff tears, rotator cuff tendinitis (RCT), calcific tendinitis, and sub acromial bursitis [3].
The patient's history and physical exam were consistent with a rotator cuff tendinitis secondary to an immune response to an influenza vaccination that infiltrated the supraspinatus tendon.
The shoulder can be injured in a variety of ways, including dislocations, labral tears, rotator cuff tears, rotator cuff tendinitis, shoulder impingement, frozen shoulder and shoulder osteoarthritis.
Effects of low-level laser therapy in combination with physiotherapy in the management of rotator cuff tendinitis. Lasers Med Sci.
[12] reported that swimmers and overhead athletes often develop swimmer's shoulder which encompasses a variety of pathological injuries, such as rotator cuff tendinitis, shoulder instability and shoulder impingement.