rotting


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rot

 (rŏt)
v. rot·ted, rot·ting, rots
v.intr.
1. To undergo decomposition, especially organic decomposition; decay. See Synonyms at decay.
2.
a. To become damaged, weakened, or useless because of decay: The beams had rotted away.
b. To disappear or fall by decaying: One could see the blackened areas where the branches had rotted off.
3. To deteriorate through neglect or inactivity; languish or decline: "He upset Alice by calling Washington ... a sink of boredom and saying he was rotting there" (John Dos Passos).
4. To decay morally; become degenerate.
v.tr.
To cause to decompose or decay.
n.
1. The process of rotting or the condition of being rotten: The rot spread quickly, rendering the bridge unsafe even for pedestrians.
2. Foot rot.
3. Any of several plant diseases characterized by the breakdown of tissue and caused by various bacteria, fungi, or oomycetes.
4. Pointless talk; nonsense: She always talks such rot.
5. Archaic Any of various diseases causing the decay of flesh.

[Middle English roten, from Old English rotian.]

rotting

(ˈrɒtɪŋ)
adj
decaying as a result of bacterial or fungal action
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rotting - (biology) the process of decay caused by bacterial or fungal actionrotting - (biology) the process of decay caused by bacterial or fungal action
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
decay - the process of gradually becoming inferior
Translations

rotting

[ˈrɒtɪŋ] ADJpodrido, que se está pudriendo

rotting

[ˈrɒtɪŋ] adj [leaves, fruit, teeth] → qui pourrit

rotting

adj meat, foodverfaulend; wood alsomodrig; carcass, bones alsoverwesend; teethfaul; fruitfaulig

rotting

[ˈrɒtɪŋ] adjin putrefazione
References in classic literature ?
And the Americans will spend the money and by the second generation start rotting in the cities, as you and your husband would have rotted if you hadn't got out.
As Mary had rotted, she thought; as Bert and all the rest had rotted; as Tom and all the rest were rotting.
Some become larger capitalists; some go into the professions; the rest spend the money and start rotting when it's gone, and if it lasts their life-time their children do the rotting for them.
They were recognized as graves by the discolored stones or rotting boards at head and foot, leaning at all angles, some prostrate; by the ruined picket fences surrounding them; or, infrequently, by the mound itself showing its gravel through the fallen leaves.
All about were evidences of a furious struggle; small sprouts of poison-oak were bent and denuded of leaf and bark; dead and rotting leaves had been pushed into heaps and ridges on both sides of the legs by the action of other feet than theirs; alongside the hips were unmistakable impressions of human knees.
Passing the end of the slight elevation of earth upon which the dead man's head and shoulders lay, his foot struck some hard substance under the rotting forest leaves, and he took the trouble to kick it into view.
All the time when we were waiting, he wasn't a bit keen and kept on rotting about the good times he might have been having in London, and what a fearful country we were stranded in, till he almost gave me the blues, and if there hadn't been some jolly good shooting and a few nice chaps up at the Fort, I should have been miserable.
But as it was, the thing that struck me with keenest force was the enormous waste of labour to which this sombre wilderness of rotting paper testified.
First reported in the UK in 2012, the flesh-eating disease can lead to a dog's flesh rotting, as well as resulting in kidney failure, vomiting and in severe cases, death.