rotund


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ro·tund

 (rō-tŭnd′)
adj.
1. Rounded in figure; plump. See Synonyms at fat.
2. Round or spherical: "a rotund jar of limpid honey" (Aleksandar Hemon).

[Latin rotundus; see ret- in Indo-European roots.]

ro·tun′di·ty, ro·tund′ness n.
ro·tund′ly adv.

rotund

(rəʊˈtʌnd)
adj
1. rounded or spherical in shape
2. plump
3. sonorous or grandiloquent; full in tone, style of speaking, etc
[C18: from Latin rotundus wheel-shaped, round, from rota wheel]
roˈtundity, roˈtundness n
roˈtundly adv

ro•tund

(roʊˈtʌnd)

adj.
1. round in shape; rounded.
2. plump; fat.
3. full-toned or sonorous: rotund phrases.
[1695–1705; < Latin rotundus round, circular, derivative of rota wheel; compare round1]
ro•tun′di•ty, ro•tund′ness, n.
ro•tund′ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rotund - spherical in shape
rounded - curving and somewhat round in shape rather than jagged; "low rounded hills"; "rounded shoulders"
2.rotund - (of sounds) full and rich; "orotund tones"; "the rotund and reverberating phrase"; "pear-shaped vowels"
full - (of sound) having marked deepness and body; "full tones"; "a full voice"
3.rotund - excessively fatrotund - excessively fat; "a weighty man"  
fat - having an (over)abundance of flesh; "he hadn't remembered how fat she was"

rotund

adjective
2. pompous, grandiloquent, orotund, magniloquent, full writing rotund passages of purple prose
3. round, rounded, spherical, bulbous, globular, orbicular rotund towers, moats and drawbridges
4. sonorous, round, deep, rich, mellow, resonant, orotund, reverberant the wonderfully rotund tones of the presenter

rotund

adjective
1. Well-rounded and full in form:
2. Having or producing a full, deep, or rich sound:
Translations

rotund

[rəʊˈtʌnd] ADJ [person] → corpulento, rotundo

rotund

[rəʊˈtʌnd] adj [person, figure] → rondelet(te)

rotund

adj personrund(lich); objectrund; speech, literary stylebombastisch, hochtrabend; voicevoll

rotund

[rəʊˈtʌnd] adj (frm) (person) → pingue; (object) → arrotondato/a
References in classic literature ?
Behind the city swept the rotund upland of St Catherine's Hill; further off, landscape beyond landscape, till the horizon was lost in the radiance of the sun hanging above it.
I smiled, for his appearance, so rotund and yet so startled, could never fail to excite a smile, and then as I came nearer I noticed that he seemed singularly disconsolate.
Then its ample seat would have been pressed by the comfortable, rotund corporation of the honest mint-master.
His person had undergone a change, analogous to the change in his dress; his figure had grown rotund and, as it were, canonical.
He had just finished dressing for his ride, and wore a blue uniform, opening in front over a white waistcoat so long that it covered his rotund stomach, white leather breeches tightly fitting the fat thighs of his short legs, and Hessian boots.
77] The portraits of actors and other theatrical celebrities range from Elizabeth, from the melodramatic costumes and faces of the contemporaries of Shakespeare, to the conventional costumes, the rotund expression, of the age of the Georges, masking a power of imaginative impersonation probably unknown in Shakespeare's day.
In the face of that perfect skin, his very fatness and mature, rotund paunch could be nothing other than normal.
By came a citizen, rotund, comfortable, home-hurrying, unknowing of the delights of waving silken scarfs on the borders of dimly-lit parks.
He was a large man, very rotund of belly and helpless looking.
Shortly afterwards came Liebard, the farmer of Toucques, short, rotund and ruddy, wearing a grey jacket and spurred boots.
As he stood, red, rotund, and radiant, before the small, wiry, cool old gentleman, he looked like a prize apple by the side of a withered crab.
By means of this I was descending rapidly, and in apparent safety, when a huge hog, about whose rotund stomach, and indeed about whose whole air and physiognomy, there was something which reminded me of the Angel of the Odd, - when this hog, I say, which hitherto had been quietly slumbering in the mud, took it suddenly into his head that his left shoulder needed scratching, and could find no more convenient rubbing-post than that afforded by the foot of the ladder.