rounceval

rounceval

(ˈraʊnsɪvəl)
n
1. (Plants) a variety of large pea
2. (European Myth & Legend) obsolete a giant or monster
adj
obsolete huge
References in periodicals archive ?
Philadelphian horticulturist Bernard McMahon lists both Green and White Rounceval, forms of wrinkle-seeded green peas, along with 15 dry peas in his 1806 broadside catalog.
(41.) Swanson cites the accounts of the Rounceval Guild of Charing Cross, which "mention batches of 'briefs'--publicity documents--purchased from Wynkyn de Worde at eight pence per hundred, and later indulgence letters from Richard Copeland at eighteen pence per hundred"; Ibid., 126.
Mary Rounceval, Charing Cross (Washington: Library of Congress, 1986).
Immediately to the east of the abbey stood the old palace of Westminster, home to the royal household until 1512 and the focal point of the nation's administrative, financial and judicial life: within its environs was the royal college of St Stephen.(10) In 1512 the residential quarters of the old palace were destroyed by fire, and so from 1529 the newly built palace of Whitehall, near Charing Cross, became the new royal residence.(11) Close by the abbey and near to the medieval palace stood the parish church of St Margaret, and, further to the north, the hospitals of St James and St Mary Rounceval.(12)
The Guild of Our Lady at the church of St Gertrude in Bergen op Zoom in Brabant sponsored daily polyphonic services in the church's Lady Chapel: in July 1497 the court of Philip the Fair visited the town, and his chapel singers performed at some of the guild's services.(71) Another Westminster guild, the Fraternity of Our Lady of Rounceval attached to the Rounceval Hospital at Charing Cross, celebrated its patronal Mass on the Nativity of Our Lady, and usually hired additional singers to perform polyphony at High Mass and Evensong; in 1523-4, for example, 19d was spent on 'ii rybbes of beef and a pyge for the syngyngmen on the dedicacon day'.
72 Westminster Abbey Muniment Room, Accounts of the Guild of St Mary Rounceval, section 1, 1520-22, 'foren and neccesarie expences first yere'; section 2, 1522-4, 'expences on the dedicacon day anno 2'.
The vernacular schedules could be glued to church doors, as attested to for the Rounceval Guild at Charing Cross, London, and the Guild of Our Lady in Boston, Lincolnshire, so becoming available for public perusal without the pardoners as oral intermediaries.
(66) In the 1520s, accounts of the Rounceval Guild of Charing Cross mention batches of "briefs"--publicity documents--purchased from Wynkyn de Worde at eight pence per hundred, and later indulgence letters from Richard Copeland at eighteen pence per hundred.
Again, details are elusive, but that the Rounceval Guild of Charing Cross commissioned documents from a printer and seemingly organised their nationwide distribution suggests control and centralization.
Mary Rounceval, Charing Cross (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 1986), 32, 84.
(Jenyns was both a churchwarden of St Margaret's and master of the Rounceval guild in 1540-42, and in 1542-5 was warden of the great guild of the Assumption.)(45) From 28 May 1552 to 5 May 1554 Ludford was himself elected a churchwarden of St Margaret's, along with Richard Castell (see illus.4).(46) The election was non-stipendiary, although 20 shillings from the church purse at least provided a supper for the 'wardens & other the worshipfull of the perisshe syttynge & takynge of [the] accompte'.(47) These politically uncertain years in the English church witnessed the death of Edward VI and the Catholic restoration upon the accession of Mary in 1553.