rousingly


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rous·ing

 (rou′zĭng)
adj.
1. Inducing enthusiasm or excitement; stirring: a rousing sermon.
2. Lively; vigorous: a rousing march tune.
3. Used as an intensive: a rousing lie.

rous′ing·ly adv.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"A Star is Born" literally harks back to another era as a remake of a remake of a remake of one of Hollywood's most beloved creation myths of celebrity and self-destruction, while "Bohemian Rhapsody" follows a similarly recognizable template that manages to be rousingly fun to watch despite its hoariest cliches.
While their distinctive thematic tones are a study in contrast-one is deliciously dour while the other, rousingly appealing-it's inarguable that they're also two of 2018's best films.
The central conundrum is this: Why on earth would anyone try to improve on -- let alone equal -- the rousingly entertaining, if melodramatic, original?
The newspaper is a sponsor of a twice-a-year "monster garage sale," a rousingly popular event with readers.
If you like Robot Wars, wait until you get a load of this* Hugh Jackman plays a washed-up who bonds with his son when they build a 'take part in a fight tournament* The CGI scraps rousingly Rocky-esque*
Minutes later, Kane had the ball whipped off his toe just as he drew back the trigger in the box and Newport fans rousingly began to believe it could be their night.
In a high-profile Senate speech July 25, McCain rousingly declared that "we are not the president's subordinates," even while casting a deciding vote to prolong Obamacare replacement legislation Trump desperately wants passed.
So, too, do the nation's politicians, both Democrat and Republican, who are given, rousingly, to concluding their speeches to the American public with the phrase "May God bless America." Surely all this bespeaks a proud and public assertion of faith.
At this point there's usually a course of rousingly zesty salads, amongst them salata tounsia --lemon and oil-drenched egg, tuna, onion, tomato and cucumber --and salata mechouia, comprising a chilled bed of mashed peppers, garlic and onion.
Shot in vivid color by Matthew Libatique, with skillful editing and a rousingly rhythmic score from A.R.
Tudorists, take heed: This fresh consideration of the queen--a woman by turns valiant and vulnerable, jealous and generous, unapproachable and compassionate--at the finis of her rule is a rousingly good read.
And even more rousingly, while admitting that "the processes of identification, sympathy, [and] imagination" deployed in the humanities can suggest "an undisciplined subjectivism" he declares that "in reality they are essential to the amplest forms of understanding, whether in scholarly work or other aspects of human experience." Accordingly, he issues the painful warning that "If we were to treat all our interlocutors' utterances merely as symptomatic rather than expressive or communicative, we would soon find ourselves leading affectively thin and relentlessly diagnostic lives" (83).