rout


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Related to rout: rout out

rout 1

 (rout)
n.
1.
a. A disorderly retreat or flight following defeat.
b. An overwhelming defeat.
2.
a. A disorderly crowd of people; a mob.
b. People of the lowest class; rabble.
3. A public disturbance; a riot.
4. A fashionable gathering.
5. Archaic A group of people, especially knights, or of animals, especially wolves.
tr.v. rout·ed, rout·ing, routs
1. To put to disorderly flight or retreat: "the flock of starlings which Jasper had routed with his gun" (Virginia Woolf).
2. To defeat overwhelmingly. See Synonyms at defeat.

[Middle English route, from Old French, troop, defeat, from Vulgar Latin *rupta, from feminine of Latin ruptus, past participle of rumpere, to break; see reup- in Indo-European roots.]

rout 2

 (rout)
v. rout·ed, rout·ing, routs
v.intr.
1. To dig with the snout; root.
2. To poke around; rummage.
v.tr.
1. To expose to view as if by digging; uncover.
2. To hollow, scoop, or gouge out.
3. To drive or force out as if by digging; eject: rout out an informant.
4. Archaic To dig up with the snout.

[Variant of root.]

rout 3

 (rout, ro͞ot)
intr.v. rout·ed, rout·ing, routs Chiefly British
To bellow. Used of cattle.

[Middle English routen, to roar, from Old Norse rauta.]

rout

(raʊt)
n
1. an overwhelming defeat
2. a disorderly retreat
3. a noisy rabble
4. (Law) law a group of three or more people proceeding to commit an illegal act
5. archaic a large party or social gathering
vb
(tr) to defeat and cause to flee in confusion
[C13: from Anglo-Norman rute, from Old French: disorderly band, from Latin ruptus broken, from rumpere to burst; see route]

rout

(raʊt)
vb
1. to dig over or turn up (something), esp (of an animal) with the snout; root
2. (tr; usually foll by out or up) to get or find by searching
3. (usually foll by: out) to force or drive out: they routed him out of bed at midnight.
4. (often foll by: out) to hollow or gouge out
5. (intr) to search, poke, or rummage
[C16: variant of root2]

rout1

(raʊt)

n.
1. a defeat attended with disorderly flight: to put an army to rout.
2. any overwhelming defeat.
3. a tumultuous or disorderly crowd of persons.
4. Law. a disturbance of the public peace by three or more persons acting together in a manner that suggests an intention to riot.
5. a large, formal evening party or social gathering.
6. Archaic. a company or band of people.
v.t.
7. to disperse in defeat and disorderly flight.
8. to defeat decisively.
[1200–50; (n.) Middle English < Anglo-French rute, Old French route a fraction, detachment < Vulgar Latin *rupta a break, Latin: n. use of feminine past participle of rumpere to break; (v.) derivative of the n.]

rout2

(raʊt)

v.i.
1. to root, as swine.
2. to poke, search, or rummage.
v.t.
3. to turn over or dig up with the snout.
4. to find or get by searching, rummaging, etc. (usu. fol. by out).
5. to cause to rise from bed.
6. to force or drive out.
7. to hollow out or furrow, as with a scoop.
[1540–50; alter. of root2; compare Middle Dutch ruten to root out]

rout4

(raʊt, rut)
v.i., v.t.
Chiefly Brit. Dial. to bellow; roar.
[1250–1300; Middle English rowten < Old Norse rauta to bellow]

Rout, Route

 a troop, throng, company; a clamourous multitude; a rabble; a tumultuous crowd—Johnson, 1755.
Examples: rout or route of Black beasts, 1576; of clerks, 1430; of rural folk, 1616; of gentlemen; of knights, 1486; of lords, 1386; of nightingales, 1366; of ragged rhymers, 1579; of roiters, 1750; of ruffians and robbers, 1568; of worldly and gallant servants, 1491; of sheep, 1821; of snails, 1440; of soldiers; of strangers, 1737; of the wicked, 1561; of wolves, 1275; of words and actions, 1624.

rout


Past participle: routed
Gerund: routing

Imperative
rout
rout
Present
I rout
you rout
he/she/it routs
we rout
you rout
they rout
Preterite
I routed
you routed
he/she/it routed
we routed
you routed
they routed
Present Continuous
I am routing
you are routing
he/she/it is routing
we are routing
you are routing
they are routing
Present Perfect
I have routed
you have routed
he/she/it has routed
we have routed
you have routed
they have routed
Past Continuous
I was routing
you were routing
he/she/it was routing
we were routing
you were routing
they were routing
Past Perfect
I had routed
you had routed
he/she/it had routed
we had routed
you had routed
they had routed
Future
I will rout
you will rout
he/she/it will rout
we will rout
you will rout
they will rout
Future Perfect
I will have routed
you will have routed
he/she/it will have routed
we will have routed
you will have routed
they will have routed
Future Continuous
I will be routing
you will be routing
he/she/it will be routing
we will be routing
you will be routing
they will be routing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been routing
you have been routing
he/she/it has been routing
we have been routing
you have been routing
they have been routing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been routing
you will have been routing
he/she/it will have been routing
we will have been routing
you will have been routing
they will have been routing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been routing
you had been routing
he/she/it had been routing
we had been routing
you had been routing
they had been routing
Conditional
I would rout
you would rout
he/she/it would rout
we would rout
you would rout
they would rout
Past Conditional
I would have routed
you would have routed
he/she/it would have routed
we would have routed
you would have routed
they would have routed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rout - a disorderly crowd of peoplerout - a disorderly crowd of people  
crowd - a large number of things or people considered together; "a crowd of insects assembled around the flowers"
lynch mob - a mob that kills a person for some presumed offense without legal authority
2.rout - an overwhelming defeat
defeat, licking - an unsuccessful ending to a struggle or contest; "it was a narrow defeat"; "the army's only defeat"; "they suffered a convincing licking"
Verb1.rout - cause to flee; "rout out the fighters from their caves"
defeat, get the better of, overcome - win a victory over; "You must overcome all difficulties"; "defeat your enemies"; "He overcame his shyness"; "He overcame his infirmity"; "Her anger got the better of her and she blew up"
2.rout - dig with the snout; "the pig was rooting for truffles"
cut into, delve, dig, turn over - turn up, loosen, or remove earth; "Dig we must"; "turn over the soil for aeration"
3.rout - make a groove in
core out, hollow out, hollow - remove the interior of; "hollow out a tree trunk"
4.rout - defeat disastrously
beat, beat out, vanquish, trounce, crush, shell - come out better in a competition, race, or conflict; "Agassi beat Becker in the tennis championship"; "We beat the competition"; "Harvard defeated Yale in the last football game"

rout

verb
1. defeat, beat, overthrow, thrash, stuff (slang), worst, destroy, chase, tank (slang), crush, scatter, conquer, lick (informal), dispel, drive off, overpower, clobber (slang), wipe the floor with (informal), cut to pieces, put to flight, drub, put to rout, throw back in confusion The Norman army routed the English opposition.
noun
1. defeat, beating, hiding (informal), ruin, overthrow, thrashing, licking (informal), pasting (slang), shambles, debacle, drubbing, overwhelming defeat, headlong flight, disorderly retreat The retreat turned into a rout.

rout

noun
The act of defeating or the condition of being defeated:
Slang: dusting, licking.
verb
To win a victory over, as in battle or a competition:
Informal: trim, whip.
Slang: ace, lick.
Idioms: carry the day, get the best of, get the better of, go someone one better.
Translations
هَزيمَة مُنْكَرَهيَهْزِم العَدو
naprostá porážkaporazit na hlavu
knusende nederlag
teljes vereség
algjör ósigurgjörsigra
sakāvesatriekt
úplná porážka
bozguna uğratmakhezimet

rout

1 [raʊt]
A. N (= defeat) → derrota f aplastante; (= flight) → desbandada f, fuga f desordenada
B. VTaplastar, derrotar aplastantemente
the enemy was routed (= defeated) → el enemigo fue aplastado; (= put to flight) → el enemigo salió en desbandada

rout

2 [raʊt] VI (also rout about) (= search) → hurgar
rout out VT + ADV
1. (= force out) to rout sb outhacer salir a algn
to rout sb out of bedsacar a algn de la cama
2. (= search for) → buscar; (= discover) → desenterrar

rout

[ˈraʊt]
ndéroute f
vt [+ army] → mettre en déroute

rout

1
n
(= defeat)Schlappe f; to put to routin die Flucht schlagen
(Jur, = mob) → Bande f, → Rotte f
vt (= defeat)in die Flucht schlagen

rout

2
vi (pig: also rout about) → herumwühlen

rout

1 [raʊt]
1. n (defeat) → disfatta, rotta
2. vtmettere in rotta, sbaragliare
rout out vt + adv (find) → scovare; (force out) → (far) sloggiare

rout

2 [raʊt] vi (search) to rout aboutfrugare, rovistare

rout

(raut) verb
to defeat (an army etc) completely.
noun
a complete defeat.
References in classic literature ?
Solomon Rout, the chief engineer, smoking his morning cigar over the skylight, would turn away his head in order to hide a smile.
Scarcely had the battle begun, when a great rout overwhelmed the Mice, who scampered off as fast as they could to their holes.
The wanton airs, from the tree-top, Laughingly through the lattice drop -- The bodiless airs, a wizard rout, Flit through thy chamber in and out, And wave the curtain canopy So fitfully -- so fearfully -- Above the closed and fringed lid
About, about, in reel and rout The death-fires danced at night; The water, like a witch's oils, Burnt green, and blue and white.
The long lances, the heavy maces, the sixbladed battle axes, and the well tempered swords of the knights played havoc among them, so that the rout was complete; but, not content with victory, Prince Edward must glut his vengeance, and so he pursued the citizens for miles, butchering great numbers of them, while many more were drowned in attempting to escape across the Ouse.
All the best of them were being worn out by the great weight of their armour, but the two valiant heroes, Thrasymedes and Antilochus, had not yet heard of the death of Patroclus, and believed him to be still alive and leading the van against the Trojans; they were keeping themselves in reserve against the death or rout of their own comrades, for so Nestor had ordered when he sent them from the ships into battle.
Five minutes later, Tom Thurston entered, and Julia Monson came down to receive HIM, her pique not interfering, and it being rather stylish to be disengaged on the morning of the day when the household was in all the confusion of a premeditated rout.
The gods must be proud, thought I, with such forked flashes to rout a poor unarmed fisherman.
I had but to make the sign of the cross, sprinkle some holy water upon them, and call them by their sweet secret names, and the whole rout had been off to the woods, with mad gambol and song, before the eyes of the astonished farmer.
Ismene tells him of the latest oracle and interprets to him its purport, that some day the Theban invaders of Athens will be routed in a battle near the grave of Oedipus.
Eos then obtains of Zeus and bestows upon her son immortality; but Achilles routs the Trojans, and, rushing into the city with them, is killed by Paris and Apollo.
A victorious army opposed to a routed one, is as a pound's weight placed in the scale against a single grain.