rubbernecker


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rub·ber·neck·er

 (rŭb′ər-nĕk′ər)
n. Slang
A gawking onlooker.

rubbernecker

(ˈrʌbəˌnekə)
n
informal a person who rubbernecks
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rubbernecker - a person who stares inquisitively
looker, spectator, viewer, watcher, witness - a close observer; someone who looks at something (such as an exhibition of some kind); "the spectators applauded the performance"; "television viewers"; "sky watchers discovered a new star"
Translations

rubbernecker

[ˈrʌbərnekər] nbadaud(e) m/frubber plant ncaoutchouc m (plante verte)rubber ring n (for swimming)bouée f, bouée f de natationrubber solution ndissolution frubber stamp ntampon mrubber-stamp [ˌrʌbərˈstæmp] vt
(lit)tamponner
(fig) [+ decision, plan, law] → approuver sans discussionrubber tree narbre m à gomme, hévéa m
References in periodicals archive ?
Bauer, pictured, who lives near Barry and used to work for the Echo's sister paper The Western Mail, won the coveted prize in 2014 for her novel Rubbernecker, which followed a medical student with Asperger's Syndrome faced with solving a possible murder.
Bauer, who lives near Barry and used to work for the Western Mail, won the coveted prize in 2014 for her novel Rubbernecker, which followed a medical student with Asperger's Syndrome faced with solving a possible murder.
He (and it was always a he) is an observer of city life, slightly more focused and sociologically minded than the French baudaud (a rubbernecker), and was a near-professional observer of the street, of life.
It was hard not to feel like a rubbernecker as you watched the actual crime scene footage.
Her fourth novel Rubbernecker was voted 2014 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year.
He gained a stage reputation after appearing with Ricky Gervais, Stephen Merchant and Jimmy Carr in the 2001 Edinburgh Fringe Festival show Rubbernecker, and has regularly supported Ricky Gervais since.
Belinda's new book, Rubbernecker, takes readers into the grim surroundings of an anatomy class at Cardiff University Hospital as main character Patrick attempts to unravel the mysteries behind a murder nobody else suspects.
Yet, I do it anyway, just like the proverbial traffic accident rubbernecker. Several weeks ago, I started reading an article about eating disorders and obesity ("I Know Why the Fat Lady Sings" at http:// online.wsj.com/article/SB100014 24052702303768104577462562370 062738.html.
Clearly, this definition of wonder would exclude "objectless curiosity." While looking at art, rainbows, or math, one runs no risk of being called a rubbernecker or a looky-loo.
Rubbernecker: When there has been an accident the rubberneckers brake hard to have a good look.
When I came across Jason Byassee's article "License to Thrill" (December 2004), I felt like a rubbernecker: I hate the "prosperity gospel," but I secretly love to read about the jokers who are writing and hawking this stuff.