rudder


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rud·der

 (rŭd′ər)
n.
1.
a. A vertically hinged plate of metal, fiberglass, or wood mounted at the stern of a ship or boat for directing its course.
b. A similar structure at the tail of an aircraft, used for effecting horizontal changes in course.
2. A controlling agent or influence over direction; a guide.

[Middle English ruder, from Old English rōther, steering oar; see erə- in Indo-European roots.]

rudder

(ˈrʌdə)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) nautical a pivoted vertical vane that projects into the water at the stern of a vessel and can be controlled by a tiller, wheel, or other apparatus to steer the vessel
2. (Aeronautics) a vertical control surface attached to the rear of the fin used to steer an aircraft, in conjunction with the ailerons
3. anything that guides or directs
[Old English rōther; related to Old French rōther, Old High German ruodar, Old Norse rōthr. See row2]
ˈrudderless adj

rud•der

(ˈrʌd ər)

n.
1. a vertical blade at the stern of a vessel that can be turned to change the vessel's direction when in motion.
2. a movable control surface attached to a vertical stabilizer, located at the rear of an airplane and used, along with the ailerons, to turn the airplane.
3. any means of directing or guiding a course.
[before 900; Middle English rodder, rother, ruder, Old English rōther, c. Old Frisian rōther, Middle Dutch rōder (Dutch roer), Old High German ruodar (German Ruder); akin to row2]
rud′der•less, adj.

rudder

- First meant "paddle" or "oar."
See also related terms for paddle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rudder - a hinged vertical airfoil mounted at the tail of an aircraft and used to make horizontal course changesrudder - a hinged vertical airfoil mounted at the tail of an aircraft and used to make horizontal course changes
aerofoil, airfoil, control surface, surface - a device that provides reactive force when in motion relative to the surrounding air; can lift or control a plane in flight
vertical tail - the vertical airfoil in the tail assembly of an aircraft
2.rudder - (nautical) steering mechanism consisting of a hinged vertical plate mounted at the stern of a vessel
sailing, seafaring, navigation - the work of a sailor
rudder blade - the vertical blade on a rudder
rudderpost, rudderstock - a vertical post at the forward edge of a rudder that enables the rudder to pivot
steering mechanism, steering system - a mechanism by which something is steered (especially a motor vehicle)
tiller - lever used to turn the rudder on a boat
vessel, watercraft - a craft designed for water transportation
Translations
دَفَّة الطائِرَهدَفَّه السَّفينَه
kormidlo
halerorror
peräsin
kormánylapátoldalkormány
stÿri
gubernaculum
vairalazdė
stūre
cârmă
krmilo

rudder

[ˈrʌdəʳ] N (Naut, Aer) → timón m

rudder

[ˈrʌdər] ngouvernail m

rudder

n (Naut, Aviat) → Ruder nt

rudder

[ˈrʌdəʳ] n (Naut) → timone m (Aer) → timone di direzione

rudder

(ˈradə) noun
1. a flat piece of wood, metal etc fixed to the back of a boat for steering.
2. a similar device on an aircraft.
References in classic literature ?
If we define a rudder as necessarily having reference to a boat, our definition will not be appropriate, for the rudder does not have this reference to a boat qua boat, as there are boats which have no rudders.
The rudder was a light frame of cane covered with silk, shaped somewhat like a battledoor, and was about three feet long, and at the widest, one foot.
Behind, a sort of rudder served to guide the vehicle.
Trusting to the girl's skill and making no use of the rudder, he eyed the coming tide with an absorbed attention.
But he rode with a sensitive "loose curb," and quickly, but not too quickly, he shifted the angles of his wing-tips, depressed the front horizontal rudder, and swung over the rear vertical rudder to meet the tilting thrust of the wind.
The eye detects no joint in her skin plating save the sweeping hair-crack of the bow-rudder--Magniac's rudder that assured us the dominion of the unstable air and left its inventor penniless and half-blind.
There was one man at the rudder, one to tend the engines, and two burly police-inspectors forward.
I heard the bows ground in the sand, staved the dingey off the rudder of the big boat with my piggin, and freeing the painter, landed.
Then the bowsprit got mixed with the rudder sometimes: A thing, as the Bellman remarked, That frequently happens in tropical climes, When a vessel is, so to speak, "snarked.
She has neither bow or stern, strictly speaking, for she has a long-bladed rudder on each end and she never turns around.
The front of the sand-boat was pointed like the bow of a ship, and there was a rudder at the stern to steer by.
There were the times I brought the Razzle Dazzle in with a bigger load of oysters than any other two-man craft; there was the time when we raided far down in Lower Bay, and mine was the only craft back at daylight to the anchorage off Asparagus Island; there was the Thursday night we raced for market and I brought the Razzle Dazzle in without a rudder, first of the fleet, and skimmed the cream of the Friday morning trade; and there was the time I brought her in from Upper Bay under a jib, when Scotty burned my mainsail.