rudder


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rud·der

 (rŭd′ər)
n.
1.
a. A vertically hinged plate of metal, fiberglass, or wood mounted at the stern of a ship or boat for directing its course.
b. A similar structure at the tail of an aircraft, used for effecting horizontal changes in course.
2. A controlling agent or influence over direction; a guide.

[Middle English ruder, from Old English rōther, steering oar; see erə- in Indo-European roots.]

rudder

(ˈrʌdə)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) nautical a pivoted vertical vane that projects into the water at the stern of a vessel and can be controlled by a tiller, wheel, or other apparatus to steer the vessel
2. (Aeronautics) a vertical control surface attached to the rear of the fin used to steer an aircraft, in conjunction with the ailerons
3. anything that guides or directs
[Old English rōther; related to Old French rōther, Old High German ruodar, Old Norse rōthr. See row2]
ˈrudderless adj

rud•der

(ˈrʌd ər)

n.
1. a vertical blade at the stern of a vessel that can be turned to change the vessel's direction when in motion.
2. a movable control surface attached to a vertical stabilizer, located at the rear of an airplane and used, along with the ailerons, to turn the airplane.
3. any means of directing or guiding a course.
[before 900; Middle English rodder, rother, ruder, Old English rōther, c. Old Frisian rōther, Middle Dutch rōder (Dutch roer), Old High German ruodar (German Ruder); akin to row2]
rud′der•less, adj.

rudder

- First meant "paddle" or "oar."
See also related terms for paddle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rudder - a hinged vertical airfoil mounted at the tail of an aircraft and used to make horizontal course changesrudder - a hinged vertical airfoil mounted at the tail of an aircraft and used to make horizontal course changes
aerofoil, airfoil, control surface, surface - a device that provides reactive force when in motion relative to the surrounding air; can lift or control a plane in flight
vertical tail - the vertical airfoil in the tail assembly of an aircraft
2.rudder - (nautical) steering mechanism consisting of a hinged vertical plate mounted at the stern of a vessel
sailing, seafaring, navigation - the work of a sailor
rudder blade - the vertical blade on a rudder
rudderpost, rudderstock - a vertical post at the forward edge of a rudder that enables the rudder to pivot
steering mechanism, steering system - a mechanism by which something is steered (especially a motor vehicle)
tiller - lever used to turn the rudder on a boat
vessel, watercraft - a craft designed for water transportation
Translations
دَفَّة الطائِرَهدَفَّه السَّفينَه
kormidlo
halerorror
peräsin
kormánylapátoldalkormány
stÿri
gubernaculum
vairalazdė
stūre
cârmă
krmilo

rudder

[ˈrʌdəʳ] N (Naut, Aer) → timón m

rudder

[ˈrʌdər] ngouvernail m

rudder

n (Naut, Aviat) → Ruder nt

rudder

[ˈrʌdəʳ] n (Naut) → timone m (Aer) → timone di direzione

rudder

(ˈradə) noun
1. a flat piece of wood, metal etc fixed to the back of a boat for steering.
2. a similar device on an aircraft.
References in classic literature ?
She has neither bow or stern, strictly speaking, for she has a long-bladed rudder on each end and she never turns around.
It was the completest and most desirable bedroom ever seen - in the stern of the vessel; with a little window, where the rudder used to go through; a little looking-glass, just the right height for me, nailed against the wall, and framed with oyster-shells; a little bed, which there was just room enough to get into; and a nosegay of seaweed in a blue mug on the table.
With this assistant, I went down to the boat again, and we all came ashore, and brought out the oars, and rudder, and boat-hook, and all else, and hauled her up for the night.
So the Doctor tumbled out of bed and went to the rudder to steer the ship.
The booms were tearing at the blocks, the rudder was banging to and fro, and the whole ship creaking, groaning, and jumping like a manufactory.
A little steering, just a touch of the rudder now and then, and with a willing listener there is no limit to the domain of equivocal speech.
The poor fellow may have been seated at one time, but the flapping and buffeting of the sails had worked through the rudder of the wheel and had dragged him to and fro, so that the cords with which he was tied had cut the flesh to the bone.
I say that, at the time I threw myself into the sea, I heard the men at the wheel say, `The screw and the rudder are broken.
cried John Bunsby, pushing back the rudder with a desperate jerk.
I heard the bows ground in the sand, staved the dingey off the rudder of the big boat with my piggin, and freeing the painter, landed.
Porthos, yielding to the pressure of the arm of the procurator's wife, as a bark yields to the rudder, arrived at the cloister St.
Another flash showed him four men clinging to the shattered mast and the rigging, while a fifth clung to the broken rudder.