rudiments


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Related to rudiments: Drum rudiments

ru·di·ment

 (ro͞o′də-mənt)
n.
1. often rudiments
a. A fundamental element, principle, or skill, as of a field of learning: the rudiments of calculus.
b. Something in an incipient or undeveloped form: the rudiments of social behavior in children; the rudiments of a plan of action.
2. Biology An imperfectly or incompletely developed organ or part.

[Latin rudīmentum, from rudis, rough, unformed.]

ru′di·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rudiments - a statement of fundamental facts or principlesrudiments - a statement of fundamental facts or principles
fact - a statement or assertion of verified information about something that is the case or has happened; "he supported his argument with an impressive array of facts"

rudiments

plural noun basics, elements, essentials, fundamentals, beginnings, foundation, nuts and bolts, first principles I think I can remember the rudiments of Latin
Translations
مَبادِئ، أُصول
základy
grundlæggende principper
alapismeretek
undirstöîuatriîi
elementarios žinios

rudiments

[ˈruːdɪmənts] npl (= basics) → rudiments mpl
to learn the rudiments of sth → apprendre les rudiments de qch

rudiments

pl
Anfangsgründe pl, → Grundlagen pl
(Biol) → Rudiment nt

rudiments

[ˈruːdɪmənts] npl the rudimentsi (primi) rudimenti mpl

rudiments

(ˈruːdimənts) noun plural
the first simple facts or rules of anything. to learn the rudiments of cookery.
rudiˈmentary (-ˈmen-) adjective
primitive or undeveloped. rudimentary tools.
References in classic literature ?
I see in a second that what I had mistook for profanity in the mines was only just the rudiments, as you may say.
Their bodies were smaller and lighter in color, and their fingers and toes bore the rudiments of nails, which were entirely lacking among the males.
Had I been in a situation to instruct them in any of the rudiments of the mechanic arts, or had I manifested a disposition to render myself in any way useful among them, their conduct might have been attributed to some adequate motive, but as it was, the matter seemed to me inexplicable.
Four membranous wings covered with little colored scales of metallic appearance; mouth forming a rolled proboscis, produced by an elongation of the jaws, upon the sides of which are found the rudiments of mandibles and downy palpi; the inferior wings retained to the superior by a stiff hair; antennae in the form of an elongated club, prismatic; abdomen pointed, The Death's -- headed Sphinx has occasioned much terror among the vulgar, at times, by the melancholy kind of cry which it utters, and the insignia of death which it wears upon its corslet.
He said, the present occasion would put to the test those excellent rudiments which he had learnt from Mr Thwackum and Mr Square; and it would be entirely owing to them, if he was enabled to survive such misfortunes.
He don't amount to shucks, as a magician; knows some of the old common tricks, but has never got beyond the rudiments, and never will.
He advised my attending certain places in London, for the acquisition of such mere rudiments as I wanted, and my investing him with the functions of explainer and director of all my studies.
You're less of a fool than many, take you all round; but you don't appear to me to have the rudiments of a notion of the rules of health.
It traced its origin to an abbey school, founded before the Conquest, where the rudiments of learning were taught by Augustine monks; and, like many another establishment of this sort, on the destruction of the monasteries it had been reorganised by the officers of King Henry VIII and thus acquired its name.
Yet he possessed his soul with patience, and during this time of his torment, when Hadly, who had been brought for the purpose from Illinois, made him over into another man* he revolved great plans in his head for the organization of the learned proletariat, and for the maintenance of at least the rudiments of education amongst the people of the abyss--all this of course in the event of the First Revolt being a failure.
Upon these, and the like reasonings, their opinion is, that parents are the last of all others to be trusted with the education of their own children; and therefore they have in every town public nurseries, where all parents, except cottagers and labourers, are obliged to send their infants of both sexes to be reared and educated, when they come to the age of twenty moons, at which time they are supposed to have some rudiments of docility.
He did not go so far as to scrape the seams with glass,--a refinement invented by the Prince of Wales; but he did practice the rudiments of English elegance with a personal satisfaction little understood by the people of Alencon.