ruffian


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Related to ruffian: Secretariat

ruf·fi·an

 (rŭf′ē-ən, rŭf′yən)
n.
1. A tough or rowdy person.
2. A thug or gangster.

[French, pimp, from Old French rufien, from Old Provençal rufian, from Old Italian ruffiano.]

ruf′fi·an·ism n.
ruf′fi·an·ly adj.

ruffian

(ˈrʌfɪən)
n
a violent or lawless person; hoodlum or villain
[C16: from Old French rufien, from Italian ruffiano, perhaps related to Langobardic hruf scurf, scabbiness]
ˈruffianism n
ˈruffianly adj

ruf•fi•an

(ˈrʌf i ən, ˈrʌf yən)

n.
1. a tough, lawless person; brutal bully.
adj.
2. Also, ruf′fi•an•ly. tough; lawless; brutal.
[1525–35; < Middle French < Italian ruffiano pander, of uncertain orig.]
ruf′fi•an•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ruffian - a cruel and brutal fellowruffian - a cruel and brutal fellow    
aggressor, assailant, assaulter, attacker - someone who attacks
bullyboy - a swaggering tough; usually one acting as an agent of a political faction
muscleman, muscle - a bully employed as a thug or bodyguard; "the drug lord had his muscleman to protect him"
skinhead - a young person who belongs to a British or American group that shave their heads and gather at rock concerts or engage in white supremacist demonstrations
plug-ugly, tough guy - someone who bullies weaker people

ruffian

noun thug, heavy (slang), tough, rough (informal), bully, casual, villain, ned (Scot. slang), rogue, hooligan, brute, rowdy, rascal, scoundrel, hoodlum, bully boy, bruiser (informal), wretch, yardie, lager lout, roughneck (slang), miscreant, boot boy, tsotsi (S. African) gangs of ruffians who lurk about

ruffian

noun
1. A rough, violent person who engages in destructive actions:
Informal: toughie.
Slang: hood, punk.
2. A person who treats others violently and roughly, especially for hire:
Informal: hooligan.
Slang: goon, gorilla, hood.
Translations
عِرْبيد، مُشاكِس
rváč
bandit
hrotti
huligāns
bitkár

ruffian

[ˈrʌfɪən] Nrufián m

ruffian

[ˈrʌfiən] nbrute f, voyou m

ruffian

nRüpel m, → Grobian m; (violent) → Schläger m; you little ruffian!du kleiner Halbstarker!

ruffian

[ˈrʌfɪən] n (old) → manigoldo

ruffian

(ˈrafiən) noun
a violent, brutal person. He was attacked by a gang of ruffians.
References in classic literature ?
The great ruffian paused, then stopped, slowly a sheepish smile overspread his countenance and going upon one knee he took the hand of Norman of Torn and kissed it, as some great and loyal noble knight might have kissed his king's hand in proof of his love and fealty.
It is proper to add, that the ruffian was well received among the tribe, and appeared to be perfectly satisfied with the compromise he had made; feeling much more at his ease among savages than among white men.
Yes, it was like a dream in which a man fancies that a ruffian is coming to attack him, and raises his arm to strike that ruffian a terrible blow which he knows should annihilate him, but then feels that his arm drops powerless and limp like a rag, and the horror of unavoidable destruction seizes him in his helplessness.
That was not a wanton ruffian; but the other would spill blood like water, as I told you at the hall, and as no man now knows better than yourself.
It was a straight left against a slogging ruffian. I emerged as you see me.
If there is, as we admit, a public sentiment among you, men of honor, justice and humanity, is there not also another kind of public sentiment among the ruffian, the brutal and debased?
Upon this I made an effort to get up, in order to put my threat into execution; but the ruffian just reached across the table very deliberately, and hitting me a tap on the forehead with the neck of one of the long bottles, knocked me back into the arm-chair from which I had half arisen.
'Come in, d'ye hear?' growled this engaging ruffian.
"Ruffians, hired by Fulbert, fell upon Abelard by night, and
The next evening, I intended with my children to Milton, but meeting two or three small parties of the ruffians, who I suppose had concealed themselves in the country, and my coachman hearing one of them say, "There he is!" my daughters were terrified and said they should never be safe, and I was forced to shelter them that night at the Castle.
Yet, notwithstanding all this, Van Baerle mounted the scaffold not the less resolutely, proud of having been the friend of that illustrious John, and godson of that noble Cornelius de Witt, whom the ruffians, who were now crowding to witness his own doom, had torn to pieces and burnt three days before.
Jones made her no answer; but snatching an old broad sword which hung in the room, he instantly sallied out, where he found the old gentleman struggling with two ruffians, and begging for mercy.