ruffianly


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ruf·fi·an

 (rŭf′ē-ən, rŭf′yən)
n.
1. A tough or rowdy person.
2. A thug or gangster.

[French, pimp, from Old French rufien, from Old Provençal rufian, from Old Italian ruffiano.]

ruf′fi·an·ism n.
ruf′fi·an·ly adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ruffianly - violent and lawlessruffianly - violent and lawless; "the more ruffianly element"; "tough street gangs"
violent - acting with or marked by or resulting from great force or energy or emotional intensity; "a violent attack"; "a violent person"; "violent feelings"; "a violent rage"; "felt a violent dislike"
Translations

ruffianly

[ˈrʌfɪənlɪ] ADJbrutal
References in classic literature ?
Joseph mumbled indistinctly in the depths of the cellar, but gave no intimation of ascending; so his master dived down to him, leaving me VIS-A-VIS the ruffianly bitch and a pair of grim shaggy sheep-dogs, who shared with her a jealous guardianship over all my movements.
A great, hulking, ruffianly sort of fellow glaring in at the window,' said Mr Pickering.
He had shown himself wild, dissipated, addicted to low pleasures, little short of ruffianly in his propensities, and recklessly expensive, with no other resources than the bounty of his uncle.
This daring miscreant detailed, with all the embellishments and flourishes suggested by his base mind and his ruffianly imagination, the attempts which he pretended Cornelius de Witt had made to corrupt him; the sums of money which were promised, and all the diabolical stratagems planned beforehand to smooth for him, Tyckelaer, all the difficulties in the path of murder.
There will be a siring of carts and mules on a certain part of the coast, and a most ruffianly lot of men, men you understand, men with wives and children and sweethearts, who from the very moment they start on a trip risk a bullet in the head at any moment, but who have a perfect conviction that I will never fail them.
I had pictured him as a more robust and ruffianly person.
The cruelty of which he had been an unwilling witness, the coarse and ruffianly behaviour of Squeers even in his best moods, the filthy place, the sights and sounds about him, all contributed to this state of feeling; but when he recollected that, being there as an assistant, he actually seemed--no matter what unhappy train of circumstances had brought him to that pass--to be the aider and abettor of a system which filled him with honest disgust and indignation, he loathed himself, and felt, for the moment, as though the mere consciousness of his present situation must, through all time to come, prevent his raising his head again.