rule out


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rule

 (ro͞ol)
n.
1.
a. Governing power or its possession or use; authority.
b. The duration of such power.
2.
a. An authoritative, prescribed direction for conduct, especially one of the regulations governing procedure in a legislative body or a regulation observed by the players in a game, sport, or contest.
b. The body of regulations prescribed by the founder of a religious order for governing the conduct of its members.
3. A usual, customary, or generalized course of action or behavior: "The rule of life in the defense bar ordinarily is to go along and get along" (Scott Turow).
4. A generalized statement that describes what is true in most or all cases: In this office, hard work is the rule, not the exception.
5. Mathematics A standard method or procedure for solving a class of problems.
6. Law
a. A court decision serving as a precedent for subsequent cases: the Miranda rule.
b. A legal doctrine or principle.
c. A court order.
d. A minor regulation or law.
e. A statute or regulation governing the court process: rule of procedure; rule of evidence.
7. See ruler.
8. Printing A thin metal strip of various widths and designs, used to print borders or lines, as between columns.
v. ruled, rul·ing, rules
v.tr.
1. To exercise control, dominion, or direction over; govern: rule a kingdom.
2.
a. To have a powerful influence over; dominate: "Many found the lanky westerner naive, and supposed that he would be ruled by one of his more commanding cabinet officers" (William Marvel).
b. To be a preeminent or dominant factor in: "It was a place where ... middle-class life was ruled by a hankering for all things foreign" (Amitav Ghosh).
3. To decide or declare authoritatively or judicially; decree: The judges ruled that the answer was acceptable. The police ruled the death a homicide. The law was ruled unconstitutional. See Synonyms at decide.
4.
a. To mark with straight parallel lines.
b. To mark (a straight line), as with a ruler.
v.intr.
1. To be in total control or command; exercise supreme authority.
2. To formulate and issue a decree or decision.
3. To prevail at a particular level or rate: Prices ruled low.
4. Slang To be excellent or superior: That new video game rules!
Phrasal Verb:
rule out
1. To prevent; preclude: The snowstorm ruled out their weekly meeting.
2. To remove from consideration; exclude: The option of starting over has been ruled out.
Idiom:
as a rule
In general; for the most part: As a rule, we take the bus.

[Middle English reule, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *regula, from Latin rēgula, rod, principle; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

rul′a·ble adj.

rule out

vb (tr, adverb)
1. to dismiss from consideration
2. to make impossible; preclude or prevent: the rain ruled out outdoor games.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.rule out - make impossible, especially beforehand
obviate, rid of, eliminate - do away with
2.rule out - include or exclude by determining judicially or in agreement with rules
decree, rule - decide with authority; "The King decreed that all firstborn males should be killed"
3.rule out - dismiss from consideration or a contest; "John was ruled out as a possible suspect because he had a strong alibi"; "This possibility can be eliminated from our consideration"

rule

noun
1. The act of exercising controlling power or the condition of being so controlled:
2. The continuous exercise of authority over a political unit:
3. A system by which a political unit is controlled:
4. A principle governing affairs within or among political units:
5. A code or set of codes governing action or procedure, for example:
6. A regular or customary matter, condition, or course of events:
verb
1. To exercise authority or influence over:
Idioms: be at the helm, be in the driver's seat, hold sway over, hold the reins.
2. To exercise the authority of a sovereign:
Archaic: sway.
Idiom: wear the crown.
3. To command or issue commands in an arrogant manner:
4. To occupy the preeminent position in:
Idioms: have the ascendancy, reign supreme.
5. To make a decision about (a controversy or dispute, for example) after deliberation, as in a court of law:
phrasal verb
rule out
1. To prohibit from occurring by advance planning or action:
2. To keep from being admitted, included, or considered:
Translations
يَسْتَبْعِدُيَسْتَبْعِد، يَسْتَثْني
vyloučit
udelukke
sulkea pois
isključiti
menggugurkan
útiloka
可能性を排除する
제외하다
avfärda
ไม่ยอมรับ
hesaba katmamakgöz önüne almamak
loại trừ

w>rule out

vt sep word, sentenceeinen Strich ziehen durch; (fig: = exclude, dismiss) → ausschließen

rule

(ruːl) noun
1. government. under foreign rule.
2. a regulation or order. school rules.
3. what usually happens or is done; a general principle. He is an exception to the rule that fat people are usually happy.
4. a general standard that guides one's actions. I make it a rule never to be late for appointments.
5. a marked strip of wood, metal etc for measuring. He measured the windows with a rule.
verb
1. to govern. The king ruled (the people) wisely.
2. to decide officially. The judge ruled that the witness should be heard.
3. to draw (a straight line). He ruled a line across the page.
ruled adjective
having straight lines drawn across. ruled paper.
ˈruler noun
1. a person who governs. the ruler of the state.
2. a long narrow piece of wood, plastic etc for drawing straight lines. I can't draw straight lines without a ruler.
ˈruling adjective
governing. the ruling party.
noun
an official decision. The judge gave his ruling.
as a rule
usually. I don't go out in the evening as a rule.
rule off
to draw a line in order to separate. He ruled off the rest of the page.
rule out
to leave out; not to consider. We mustn't rule out the possibility of bad weather.

rule out

يَسْتَبْعِدُ vyloučit udelukke ausschließen αποκλείω descartar sulkea pois éliminer isključiti escludere 可能性を排除する 제외하다 uitsluiten utelukke przekreślić descartar отвергать avfärda ไม่ยอมรับ hesaba katmamak loại trừ 排除
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That's why they did an MRI to rule out the fact it wasn't anything more than hip soreness.