rules


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rule

 (ro͞ol)
n.
1.
a. Governing power or its possession or use; authority.
b. The duration of such power.
2.
a. An authoritative, prescribed direction for conduct, especially one of the regulations governing procedure in a legislative body or a regulation observed by the players in a game, sport, or contest.
b. The body of regulations prescribed by the founder of a religious order for governing the conduct of its members.
3. A usual, customary, or generalized course of action or behavior: "The rule of life in the defense bar ordinarily is to go along and get along" (Scott Turow).
4. A generalized statement that describes what is true in most or all cases: In this office, hard work is the rule, not the exception.
5. Mathematics A standard method or procedure for solving a class of problems.
6. Law
a. A court decision serving as a precedent for subsequent cases: the Miranda rule.
b. A legal doctrine or principle.
c. A court order.
d. A minor regulation or law.
e. A statute or regulation governing the court process: rule of procedure; rule of evidence.
7. See ruler.
8. Printing A thin metal strip of various widths and designs, used to print borders or lines, as between columns.
v. ruled, rul·ing, rules
v.tr.
1. To exercise control, dominion, or direction over; govern: rule a kingdom.
2.
a. To have a powerful influence over; dominate: "Many found the lanky westerner naive, and supposed that he would be ruled by one of his more commanding cabinet officers" (William Marvel).
b. To be a preeminent or dominant factor in: "It was a place where ... middle-class life was ruled by a hankering for all things foreign" (Amitav Ghosh).
3. To decide or declare authoritatively or judicially; decree: The judges ruled that the answer was acceptable. The police ruled the death a homicide. The law was ruled unconstitutional. See Synonyms at decide.
4.
a. To mark with straight parallel lines.
b. To mark (a straight line), as with a ruler.
v.intr.
1. To be in total control or command; exercise supreme authority.
2. To formulate and issue a decree or decision.
3. To prevail at a particular level or rate: Prices ruled low.
4. Slang To be excellent or superior: That new video game rules!
Phrasal Verb:
rule out
1. To prevent; preclude: The snowstorm ruled out their weekly meeting.
2. To remove from consideration; exclude: The option of starting over has been ruled out.
Idiom:
as a rule
In general; for the most part: As a rule, we take the bus.

[Middle English reule, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *regula, from Latin rēgula, rod, principle; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

rul′a·ble adj.

Rules

(ruːlz)
pl n
1. (Australian Rules Football) short for Australian Rules
2. (Historical Terms) the Rules English history the neighbourhood around certain prisons (esp the Fleet and King's Bench prison) in which trusted prisoners were allowed to live under specified restrictions

rules

  • lect - A regional or social variety within a language, a form of speech defined by a homogenous set of rules.
  • precisian - An overly precise person, a strict observer of rules and procedures.
  • ring - Boxing started off in circles, and when the Marquess of Queensbury introduced a set of rules in 1867, he also introduced the roped-off square, which continued to be called the "ring."
  • mistress - First meant "a woman who rules or has control," or a "woman who employs others, as servants."
Translations
References in classic literature ?
To strain the facts to fit the rules of history: to say that the field of battle at Borodino remained in the hands of the Russians, or that after Moscow there were other battles that destroyed Napoleon's army, is impossible.
But notwithstanding the imperfection of the rule as applied to the relative wealth and contributions of the States, it is evidently the least objectionable among the practicable rules, and had too recently obtained the general sanction of America, not to have found a ready preference with the convention.
The wind rules the aspects of the sky and the action of the sea.
for it seems perhaps difficult to conceive that any one should have had enough of impudence to lay down dogmatical rules in any art or science without the least foundation.
Because men, when they receive good from him of whom they were expecting evil, are bound more closely to their benefactor; thus the people quickly become more devoted to him than if he had been raised to the principality by their favours; and the prince can win their affections in many ways, but as these vary according to the circumstances one cannot give fixed rules, so I omit them; but, I repeat, it is necessary for a prince to have the people friendly, otherwise he has no security in adversity.
And in the Country of the Munchkins, over at the East, everything is blue; and in the South country of the Quadlings everything is red; and in the West country of the Winkies, where the Tin Woodman rules, everything is yellow.
He swept away the virtues and the vices, the established laws of good and evil, with the idea of finding out the rules of life for himself.
We will now consider a little more in detail the circumstances and rules governing the sterility of first crosses and of hybrids.
Mighty Jove," they cried, "send unto us a king that will rule over us and keep us in order.
Now the worst part of the punishment is that he who refuses to rule is liable to be ruled by one who is worse than himself.
Neither the value of lands, nor the numbers of the people, which have been successively proposed as the rule of State contributions, has any pretension to being a just representative.
Kindness is all very well, but you can't rule them by kindness only.