runic


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run·ic

 (ro͞on′ĭk)
adj.
Of, relating to, or written in runes.
n.
Runic The Germanic language of the oldest runic inscriptions from northern Europe, dating to between the third and sixth centuries ad, and considered by some to be close to or identical with the putative common ancestor of the North and West Germanic languages.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.runic - relating to or consisting of runes; "runic inscription"
Translations

runic

[ˈruːnɪk] ADJrúnico

runic

adjrunisch, Runen-; runic symbolRunenzeichen nt
References in classic literature ?
While the stars that oversprinkle All the heavens, seem to twinkle With a crystalline delight; Keeping time, time, time, In a sort of Runic rhyme, To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells From the bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells, bells, bells - From the jingling and the tinkling of the bells.
And he dances, and he yells; Keeping time, time, time, In a sort of Runic rhyme, To the pæan of the bells - Of the bells: - Keeping time, time, time, In a sort of Runic rhyme, To the throbbing of the bells - Of the bells, bells, bells - To the sobbing of the bells: - Keeping time, time, time, As he knells, knells, knells, In a happy Runic rhyme, To the rolling of the bells - Of the bells, bells, bells: - To the tolling of the bells - Of the bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells, bells, bells - To the moaning and the groaning of the bells.
The "livre de lecture" was the "Vicar of Wakefield," much used in foreign schools because it is supposed to contain prime samples of conversational English; it might, however, have been a Runic scroll for any resemblance the words, as enunciated by Jules, bore to the language in ordinary use amongst the natives of Great Britain.
5 While the stars that oversprinkle All the Heavens, seem to twinkle With a crystalline delight; Keeping time, time, time, In a sort of Runic rhyme, 10 To the tintinabulation that so musically wells From the bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells, bells, bells-From the jingling and the tinkling of the bells.
Bengt Odenstedt reviews Richard Morris's book Runic and Mediterranean Epigraphy, with a refreshingly undogmatic mixture of reservation and admiration.
It also contained four symbols, two of which were said to be runes (from the ancient runic alphabet) and two were thought to be sigils (symbols used in magic).
Tolkien says that the use of runes in Middle-earth at the time of The Hobbit was largely limited to the dwarves (although Gandalf later leaves a runic inscription at Weathertop for Strider [I.xi.198-9]); both the Anglo-Saxons and the Scandinavians, however, made extensive use of them (Page; Elliott), providing a nice link between Tolkien's imaginary world and the real world that occupied his scholarly life.
Maes Howe, Orkney: Europe's best-preserved neolithic chambered cairn also contains fine examples of Viking runic inscriptions and drawings.
So, for example, Rudolf Simek covers Germanic religion and the conversion to Christianity, while the cultural status of the written word is addressed in fairly theoretical terms by Graeme Dunphy (looking at the Mundlichkeit/Schriftlichkeit dichotomy), and in practical terms by Klaus Duwel (explaining the runic alphabet).
"It was really the work of decades and everything he was involved in, as a scholar, all the runic knowledge and the knowledge of northern mythology came into the story," added Liz Merryis.
There's Bilbo Baggins' house in Bag End, a map of Middleearth, runic writing and mystic symbols including the evil eye of sinister sorcerer Sauron.
The crystal healing wands, incense holders, runic gemstones and the jewellery I wore are all available from Gem Journey.