rusk


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rusk

 (rŭsk)
n.
1. A light, soft-textured sweetened biscuit.
2. Sweet raised bread dried and browned in an oven.

[Spanish or Portuguese rosca, coil, bread ring, of unknown origin.]

rusk

(rʌsk)
n
(Cookery) a light bread dough, sweet or plain, baked twice until it is brown, hard, and crisp: often given to babies
[C16: from Spanish or Portuguese rosca screw, bread shaped in a twist, of unknown origin]

Rusk

(rʌsk)
n
(Biography) (David) Dean. 1909–94, US statesman: secretary of state (1961–69). He defended US military involvement in Vietnam and opposed recognition of communist China

rusk

(rʌsk)

n.
a slice of sweet raised bread dried and baked again in the oven; zwieback.
[1585–95; alter. of Sp or Portuguese rosca twisted bread]

Rusk

(rʌsk)

n.
(David) Dean, 1909–94, U.S. Secretary of State 1961–69.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rusk - slice of sweet raised bread baked again until it is brown and hard and crisprusk - slice of sweet raised bread baked again until it is brown and hard and crisp
toast - slices of bread that have been toasted
Translations
dětský sucharsuchar
tvebak
korppu
dvopek
ラスク
러스크
skorpa
ขนมปังกรอบที่ใช้เลี้ยงเด็ก
bánh quy

rusk

[rʌsk] N (esp Brit) (esp for babies) → galleta f, bizcocho m tostado

rusk

[ˈrʌsk] nbiscotte f

rusk

nZwieback m

rusk

[rʌsk] nfetta biscottata

rusk

بُقْسُماط dětský suchar tvebak Zwieback παξιμάδι galleta crujiente korppu biscotte dvopek biscotto ラスク 러스크 beschuit kavring sucharek biscoito, sequilho сухарь skorpa ขนมปังกรอบที่ใช้เลี้ยงเด็ก bebe bisküvisi bánh quy 甜饼干
References in classic literature ?
He said that was true; so he brought a large basket of rusk or biscuit, and three jars of fresh water, into the boat.
So I gave Xury a piece of rusk bread to eat, and a dram out of our patron's case of bottles which I mentioned before; and we hauled the boat in as near the shore as we thought was proper, and so waded on shore, carrying nothing but our arms and two jars for water.
An' wuth such masters uz a captun serves--the owners, the underwriters, an' the Board o' Trade, all pullun' an wantun' dufferent thungs--the owners wantun' quick passages an' domn the rusk, the underwriters wantun' safe passages an' domn the delay, an' the Board o' Trade wantun' cautious passages an' caution always meanun' delay.
Make a pan of rusks and apologize for having no old bread," suggested the Story Girl, probably by way of teasing Felicity.
But you run over home for a loaf of stale bread, Sara, and it's a good idea about the rusks.
The Story Girl sat rather sulkily in her corner; she was angry because Felicity would not let her make the rusks, and also, perhaps, a little vexed because she could not charm Great-aunt Eliza with her golden voice and story-telling gift.
The rusks were especially good and Great- aunt Eliza ate three of them and praised them.
Upon this, the old woman cleared the little table, went out of the room, and quickly returned with a tray on which was a dish of little rusks and a small precise pat of butter, cool, symmetrical, white, and plump.
Apollon," I whispered in feverish haste, flinging down before him the seven roubles which had remained all the time in my clenched fist, "here are your wages, you see I give them to you; but for that you must come to my rescue: bring me tea and a dozen rusks from the restaurant.
He rose, but she would not let him go until she had given him bread and butter and rusks.
A round, black, shining face is hers, so glossy as to suggest the idea that she might have been washed over with white of eggs, like one of her own tea rusks.
there stood a strong man, with a mighty hamper, which, being hauled into the room and presently unpacked, disgorged such treasures as tea, and coffee, and wine, and rusks, and oranges, and grapes, and fowls ready trussed for boiling, and calves'-foot jelly, and arrow-root, and sago, and other delicate restoratives, that the small servant, who had never thought it possible that such things could be, except in shops, stood rooted to the spot in her one shoe, with her mouth and eyes watering in unison, and her power of speech quite gone.