russet


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rus·set

 (rŭs′ĭt)
n.
1. A moderate to strong brown.
2. A coarse gray, brown, or reddish-brown homespun cloth.
3. A winter apple with a rough reddish-brown skin.
4. Any of various varieties of potato having reddish-brown skin, especially a russet Burbank.
adj.
Moderate to strong brown.

[Middle English, from Old French rousset, from rous, red, from Latin russus; see reudh- in Indo-European roots.]

russet

(ˈrʌsɪt)
n
1. (Colours) brown with a yellowish or reddish tinge
2. (Textiles)
a. a rough homespun fabric, reddish-brown in colour, formerly in use for clothing
b. (as modifier): a russet coat.
3. (Plants) any of various apples with rough brownish-red skins
4. (Plant Pathology) abnormal roughness on fruit, caused by parasites, pesticides, or frost
adj
5. (Tanning) (of tanned hide leather) dressed ready for staining
6. archaic simple; homely; rustic: a russet life.
7. (Colours) of the colour russet: russet hair.
[C13: from Anglo-Norman, from Old French rosset, from rous, from Latin russus; related to Latin ruber red]
ˈrussety adj

rus•set

(ˈrʌs ɪt)

n.
1. yellowish brown, light brown, or reddish brown.
2. a coarse reddish brown or brownish homespun cloth formerly used for clothing.
3. any of various apples that have a rough brownish skin and ripen in the autumn.
adj.
4. yellowish brown, light brown, or reddish brown.
[1225–75; Middle English < Old French rousset, diminutive of rous reddish brown, red (of hair); see roux]
rus′set•y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.russet - a reddish brown homespun fabric
homespun - a rough loosely woven fabric originally made with yarn that was spun at home
Adj.1.russet - of brown with a reddish tinge
chromatic - being or having or characterized by hue
Translations

russet

[ˈrʌsɪt]
A. N (= colour) → color m rojizo or bermejo
B. ADJ (in colour) → rojizo, bermejo

russet

[ˈrʌsɪt]
nroux m
adjroussâtre

russet

n
(= colour)gelbliches Rotbraun
(= apple)Boskop m
adjrostfarben

russet

[ˈrʌsɪt] adj (colour) → marrone rossiccio inv
References in classic literature ?
We went out of the old orchard where the autumn night wind was beginning to make its weird music in the russet boughs, and shut the little gate behind us.
No gentleman were admitted, so Jo played male parts to her heart's content and took immense satisfaction in a pair of russet leather boots given her by a friend, who knew a lady who knew an actor.
He was a fine swarthy fellow, with dark hair and large moustachios, who rode a-hunting in clothes of Lincoln green, with russet boots on his feet, and a bugle slung over his shoulder like the guard of a long stage.
The air was like sparkling cider, and every field had its heaps of yellow and russet good things to eat, all ready for the barns, the mills, and the markets.
Some of the trees bore yellow oranges and some russet pears, so the hungry adventurers suddenly found themselves provided with plenty to eat and to drink.
But I was not going to restrict myself to any particular position for her; when I was tired of leaning forward, with the cold, raw wind in my face, and surveying the russet hedges and the damp, tangled grass of their banks, I gave it up and leant back too.
But I suppose I am like a Roxbury russet,--a great deal the better, the longer I can be kept.
And yet a russet gown, torn and soiled with the child's rude play, made a picture of her just as perfect.
The Jew's dress, which appeared to have suffered considerably from the storm, was a plain russet cloak of many folds, covering a dark purple tunic.
No," said Winter, then he paused; "but tell me, can you not perceive the russet tint which marks the heavens?
They were a boy and a girl, slender and graceful, and completely naked, with the exception of a slight girdle of bark, from which depended at opposite points two of the russet leaves of the bread-fruit tree.
One or two were slowly assuming the russet of age; while the uncovered beams that were to be seen through the broken windows of their second stories showed that either the taste or the vanity of their proprietors had led them to undertake a task which they were unable to accomplish.