sabermetrician


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sabermetrician

(ˌseɪbəməˈtrɪʃən)
n
(Baseball) someone who practises sabermetrics
References in periodicals archive ?
And White Sox manager Rick Renteria went old-school outhouse when asked about his lineup shuffling, telling media: "I'm not going to appeal to the sabermetrician on a daily basis.
But they had no connection to or influence over Major League Baseball itself, so their ideas remained a minor sideshow for more than 20 years--until Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland As, one of the league's most unsuccessful teams, hired Paul DePodesta as a "sabermetrician," applied data analysis to his organization, and began winning baseball games with one of the lowest-paid teams in the league.
A baseball fan who was not already a sabermetrician (2) will see the game differently after reading Moneyball.
Before Silver used his statistical powers for politics, he used them as a sabermetrician for predicting baseball outcomes.
The Signal and the Noise Why So Many Predictions Fail--But Some Don't | NATE SILVER: Silver, an American statistician, sabermetrician (one who analyzes baseball statistics--we had to look that one up), psephologist (one who scientifically analyzes elections; we looked that one up, too), and writer, explores the world of prediction--from the NBA to the stock market.
"At the end of the day, you need good scouts, a good sabermetrician, a good general manager, a president willing to decentralize the decision-making process, and you have to have some luck, and the Rockies haven't put it together."
(5.) I must give proper respect to the first sabermetrician, Allan Roth, whose work with the Dodgers, initially with Branch Rickey, was truly groundbreaking and set the stage for the analytic revolution we currently enjoy.
1 Sabermetrician Bill _______ is now an adviser with the Red Sox
Once again, we'll dust off an old -- now seemingly quaint -- formula developed in the early 1980s by famed sabermetrician Bill James.
For them, the power to decide the meaning of "value" should rest in the hands of the people who have always decided it, not up-and-coming sabermetrician journalists.
"We live in an environment now where there's a lot of open data, which makes people less tolerant of letting people be gatekeepers," argues Silver, who at Baseball Prospectus was a top sabermetrician and has since abandoned baseball metrics in favor of predicting elections for the New York Times.