sacrilege


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sac·ri·lege

 (săk′rə-lĭj)
n.
Desecration, profanation, misuse, or theft of something regarded as sacred.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin sacrilegium, from sacrilegus, one who steals sacred things : sacer, sacred; see sacred + legere, to gather; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

sac′ri·le′gist (săk′rə-lē′jĭst) n.

sacrilege

(ˈsækrɪlɪdʒ)
n
1. the misuse or desecration of anything regarded as sacred or as worthy of extreme respect: to play Mozart's music on a kazoo is sacrilege.
2. the act or an instance of taking anything sacred for secular use
[C13: from Old French sacrilège, from Latin sacrilegium, from sacrilegus temple-robber, from sacra sacred things + legere to take]
sacrilegist n

sac•ri•lege

(ˈsæc rə lɪdʒ)

n.
1. the violation or profanation of anything sacred or held sacred.
2. an instance of this.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Old French < Latin sacrilegium=sacri-, comb. form of sacrum sacred object or place + leg(ere) to steal, literally, gather + -ium -ium1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sacrilege - blasphemous behaviorsacrilege - blasphemous behavior; the act of depriving something of its sacred character; "desecration of the Holy Sabbath"
irreverence, violation - a disrespectful act

sacrilege

noun
1. desecration, violation, blasphemy, mockery, heresy, irreverence, profanity, impiety, profanation, profaneness Stealing from a place of worship was considered a sacrilege.
desecration respect, reverence, piety

sacrilege

noun
An act of disrespect or impiety toward something regarded as sacred:
Translations
تَدْنيس المُقَدَّسات
svatokrádež
helligbrøde
helgispjöll, vanhelgun
šventvagiškaišventvagystė
svētuma apgānīšanazaimizaimošana
kutsal şeylere saygısızlık

sacrilege

[ˈsækrɪlɪdʒ] N (lit, fig) → sacrilegio m

sacrilege

[ˈsækrɪlɪdʒ] n
(= offence to religion) → sacrilège m
(= offensive act) → sacrilège m

sacrilege

nSakrileg nt; (fig also)Frevel m; that would be sacrilegedas wäre ein Sakrileg or Frevel

sacrilege

[ˈsækrɪlɪdʒ] nsacrilegio

sacrilege

(ˈsӕkrəlidʒ) noun
the act of using a holy thing or place in a wicked way. Robbing a church is considered (a) sacrilege.
ˈsacriˈlegious (-ˈlidʒəs) adjective
ˌsacriˈlegiously adverb
ˌsacriˈlegiousness noun
References in classic literature ?
Why, I can get him sent off to Siberia for that alone, if I like; it's sacrilege. Here, you--scarecrow!" he added, addressing the clerk at his side, "is it sacrilege or not, by law?'
It is sacrilege to struggle against so many things, my Lord.
The generations succeeded each other; the warrior who had committed the sacrilege perished miserably; the Moonstone passed
The time at length arrives when grief is rather an indulgence than a necessity; and the smile that plays upon the lips, although it may be deemed a sacrilege, is not banished.
Thwackum was resolved a crime of this kind, which he called sacrilege, should not go unpunished.
And it is SACRILEGE to have it degraded to the level of a baking powder advertisement.
For gif adultery, sacrilege, oppression, barbarous cruelty, and theft heaped upon theft, deserve hell, the great King of Carrick can no more escape hell for ever, than the imprudent Abbot escaped the fire for a season as follows.
A burning torch lay on the ground near the first man whom the mule had thrown, by the light of which Don Quixote perceived him, and coming up to him he presented the point of the lance to his face, calling on him to yield himself prisoner, or else he would kill him; to which the prostrate man replied, "I am prisoner enough as it is; I cannot stir, for one of my legs is broken: I entreat you, if you be a Christian gentleman, not to kill me, which will be committing grave sacrilege, for I am a licentiate and I hold first orders."
The priests took their places in front of the judge, and the clerk proceeded to read in a loud voice a complaint of sacrilege against Phileas Fogg and his servant, who were accused of having violated a place held consecrated by the Brahmin religion.
"No; for I saw God's justice placed in the hands of Benedetto, and should have thought it sacrilege to oppose the designs of providence."
There was an appearance of sacrilege, in her eyes, in the act of appropriating these things to herself.
There are natures in which, if they love us, we are conscious of having a sort of baptism and consecration: they bind us over to rectitude and purity by their pure belief about us; and our sins become that worst kind of sacrilege which tears down the invisible altar of trust.