sacristy

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sac·ris·ty

 (săk′rĭ-stē)
n. pl. sac·ris·ties
A room in a church housing the sacred vessels and vestments; a vestry.

[Middle English sacristie, from Anglo-Norman, from Medieval Latin sacristia, from sacrista, sacristan; see sacristan.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sacristy

(ˈsækrɪstɪ)
n, pl -ties
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a room attached to a church or chapel where the sacred vessels, vestments, etc, are kept and where priests attire themselves
[C17: from Medieval Latin sacristia; see sacristan]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sac•ris•ty

(ˈsæk rɪ sti)

n., pl. -ties.
a room in a church in which sacred vessels, vestments, etc., are kept.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Medieval Latin sacristia vestry =sacrist(a) (see sacristan) + -ia -y3]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sacristy - a room in a church where sacred vessels and vestments are kept or meetings are heldsacristy - a room in a church where sacred vessels and vestments are kept or meetings are held
church building, church - a place for public (especially Christian) worship; "the church was empty"
room - an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
sakaristo
zakrystia

sacristy

[ˈsækrɪstɪ] Nsacristía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sacristy

nSakristei f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sacristy

[ˈsækrɪstɪ] nsagrestia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The reader travelling in Italy, or Belgium perhaps, has doubtless visited one or more of those spacious sacristies, introduced to which for the inspection of some more than usually recherche work of art, one is presently dominated by their reverend quiet: simple people coming and going there, devout, or at least on devout business, with half-pitched voices, not without touches of kindly humour, in what seems to express like a picture the most genial side, midway between the altar and the home, of the ecclesiastical life.
Burglars ransacked the sacristies at St Paul's Church in Dooradoyle and St Oliver Plunkett Church in Mungret, Co Limerick, and stole the cash just hours after Easter dues were given to the priests at vigils.
Also, the celebrant must consume all that remains, instead of pouring it down the sink - a desecration of the Sacred Species occurring in some sacristies. Also, silence must now be maintained in Church both before and after Mass.