sagacious


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sa·ga·cious

 (sə-gā′shəs)
adj.
Having or showing keen discernment, sound judgment, and farsightedness. See Synonyms at shrewd.

[From Latin sagāx, sagāc-, of keen perception; see sāg- in Indo-European roots.]

sa·ga′cious·ly adv.
sa·ga′cious·ness n.

sagacious

(səˈɡeɪʃəs)
adj
1. having or showing sagacity; wise
2. (Hunting) obsolete (of hounds) having an acute sense of smell
[C17: from Latin sagāx, from sāgīre to be astute]
saˈgaciously adv
saˈgaciousness n

sa•ga•cious

(səˈgeɪ ʃəs)

adj.
1. having or showing acute mental discernment and keen practical sense; shrewd: a sagacious lawyer.
2. Obs. keen of scent.
[1600–10; < Latin sagāx keen-scented, acute, discerning; see -acious]
sa•ga′cious•ly, adv.
sa•ga′cious•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sagacious - acutely insightful and wise; "much too perspicacious to be taken in by such a spurious argument"; "observant and thoughtful, he was given to asking sagacious questions"; "a source of valuable insights and sapient advice to educators"
wise - having or prompted by wisdom or discernment; "a wise leader"; "a wise and perceptive comment"
2.sagacious - skillful in statecraft or management; "an astute and sagacious statesman"
politic - marked by artful prudence, expedience, and shrewdness; "it is neither polite nor politic to get into other people's quarrels"; "a politic decision"; "a politic manager"; "a politic old scoundrel"; "a shrewd and politic reply"

sagacious

sagacious

adjective
1. Possessing or showing sound judgment and keen perception:
2. Possessing, proceeding from, or exhibiting good judgment and prudence:
Translations
ثاقِب الفِكْر
prozíravý
forstandig
vitur, kænn
gudrsprātīgssaprātīgs

sagacious

[səˈgeɪʃəs] ADJ (frm) [person, remark] → sagaz

sagacious

[səˈgeɪʃəs] adj (= wise) → sage

sagacious

adj, sagaciously
advweise, klug

sagacious

[səˈgeɪʃəs] adjsagace

sagacious

(səˈgeiʃəs) adjective
showing intelligence, wisdom and good judgement. The old priest was learned and sagacious.
saˈgaciously adverb
sagacity (səˈgӕsəti) noun
References in classic literature ?
For though some old naturalists have maintained that all creatures of the land are of their kind in the sea; and though taking a broad general view of the thing, this may very well be; yet coming to specialties, where, for example, does the ocean furnish any fish that in disposition answers to the sagacious kindness of the dog?
But this same bone is not in the tail; it is in the head, which is a sad mistake for a sagacious lawyer like Prynne.
Matters of a much more extraordinary kind are to be the subject of this history, or I should grossly mis-spend my time in writing so voluminous a work; and you, my sagacious friend, might with equal profit and pleasure travel through some pages which certain droll authors have been facetiously pleased to call
But this art also must one learn: to HAVE a shell, and a fine appearance, and sagacious blindness!
To those who have cherished an affection for a faithful and sagacious dog, I need hardly be at the trouble of explaining the nature or the intensity of the gratification thus derivable.
This new life of the Doctor's was an anxious life, no doubt; still, the sagacious Mr.
The busy and sagacious bees fixed their republic in the clefts of the rocks and hollows of the trees, offering without usance the plenteous produce of their fragrant toil to every hand.
This class of boys, in short, must supply the world with those active, skilful hands, and clear, sagacious heads, without which the affairs of life would be thrown into confusion by the theories of studious and visionary men.
On preparing the morning's meal, however, a number of cups, knives, and other articles were missing, which had, doubtless, been carried off by the fictitious elk, during the slumber of the very sagacious sentinel.
The capital was furnished by himself he, in fact, constituted the company; for, though he had a board of directors, they were merely nominal; the whole business was conducted on his plans and with his resources, but he preferred to do so under the imposing and formidable aspect of a corporation, rather than in his individual name, and his policy was sagacious and effective.
The stratagem was good while it was unsuspected, but after that the marauders simply gave the sagacious United States mail an emetic and sat down to wait.
The sagacious Barclay de Tolly, seeing crowds of wounded men running back and the disordered rear of the army, weighed all the circumstances, concluded that the battle was lost, and sent his favorite officer to the commander in chief with that news.