sagebrush


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sage·brush

 (sāj′brŭsh′)
n.
1. Any of several aromatic plants of the genus Artemisia of the composite family, especially A. tridentata, a shrub of arid regions of western North America, having silver-green leaves and large clusters of small white flower heads.
2. An area dominated by sagebrush.

sagebrush

(ˈseɪdʒˌbrʌʃ)
n
(Plants) any of several aromatic plants of the genus Artemisia, esp A. tridentata, a shrub of W North America, having silver-green leaves and large clusters of small white flowers: family Asteraceae (composites)

sage•brush

(ˈseɪdʒˌbrʌʃ)

n.
any of several sagelike, bushy composite plants of the genus Artemisia, esp. A. tridentata, having silvery wedge-shaped leaves with three teeth at the tip: common on the dry plains of the western U.S.
[1825–35, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sagebrush - any of several North American composite subshrubs of the genera Artemis or Seriphidiumsagebrush - any of several North American composite subshrubs of the genera Artemis or Seriphidium
aster family, Asteraceae, Compositae, family Asteraceae, family Compositae - plants with heads composed of many florets: aster; daisy; dandelion; goldenrod; marigold; lettuces; ragweed; sunflower; thistle; zinnia
Artemisia filifolia, sand sage, silvery wormwood - silver-haired shrub of central and southern United States and Mexico; a troublesome weed on rangelands
Artemis spinescens, bud brush, bud sagebrush - a perennial that is valuable as sheep forage in the United States
Artemisia cana, gray sage, grey sage, Seriphidium canum, silver sage, silver sagebrush - low much-branched perennial of western United States having silvery leaves; an important browse and shelter plant
Artemisia tridentata, big sagebrush, Seriphidium tridentatum, blue sage - aromatic shrub of arid regions of western North America having hoary leaves
subshrub, suffrutex - low-growing woody shrub or perennial with woody base
Translations

sagebrush

[ˈseɪdʒbrʌʃ] N (US) → artemisa f
the Sagebrush StateNevada
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevada ranchers, the most vocal of sagebrush rebels and the most intent on kicking Uncle Sam out of the West, receive on average $18,000 per year for every man and woman in the program.
The Sagebrush Rebellion was "a temper tantrum over public lands thrown by a handful of Nevada cowboys," according to Ron Arnold of the Wise Use Movement.
The device, called the Roto-Lok rotary drive, made by Sagebrush Technology in Albuquerque, N.
the "Company") (OTCBB: LBSR) is pleased to announce that it has signed a binding Letter of Intent ("LOI") for the purposes of forming a joint venture agreement with Sagebrush Gold Ltd.
The Bureau of Land Management is initiating environmental analyses of fuel breaks, fuels reduction and habitat restoration projects on sagebrush steppe rangelands in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Utah and California to ensure healthy, productive working landscapes and wildlife habitats.
Fish and Wildlife Service classifies the Dunes Sagebrush Lizard as endangered, the Texas Conservation Plan would allow oil and gas operations to continue under certain conditions that protect the lizards.
The Deschutes Brewery Sagebrush Classic, a fundraising feast featuring 18 top chefs from the United States and beyond, is set for July 18 at Broken Top Golf Course in Bend.
The researchers took the sagebrush plant as the test subject and found that it responded to cues of self and non-self without physical contact.
On this particular stretch of the station's landscape, the leathery, silver-blue leaves of sagebrush wall him in on all sides.
A sheriff's helicopter crew searched Tuesday night after the man's wife reported him missing, but the 22-foot-long plane's wreckage wasn't spotted among the creosote bushes and sagebrush until after the sun came up Tuesday.
Sagebrush Corporation has joined the Texas Library Association in honoring those books deemed the best for children as voted by schools around Texas with the sponsorship of the Texas Bluebonnet Awards.
Two exotics--tamarisk and cheat grass--are taking over where willows and sagebrush used to be.