saints


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saint

 (sānt)
n.
1. Christianity
a. Abbr. St. or S. A person officially recognized, especially by canonization, as being entitled to public veneration and capable of interceding for people on earth.
b. A person who has died and gone to heaven.
c. Saint A member of any of various Christian groups, especially a Latter-Day Saint.
2. A person who is venerated for holiness in a non-Christian religious tradition.
3. An extremely virtuous person.
tr.v. saint·ed, saint·ing, saints
1. To name, recognize, or venerate as a saint.
2. To regard or venerate as extremely virtuous.

[Middle English seint, from Old French saint, from Late Latin sānctus, from Latin, holy, past participle of sancīre, to consecrate; see sak- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Saints


any of the editors of the Acta Sanctorum, a critical and official hagiology begun by the Jesuits in the 17th century.
the devotion, veneration, or respect accorded saints.
the writing and critical study of the lives of the saints; hagiology. — hagiographer, n. — hagiographic, hagiographical, adj.
the veneration or worship of saints. — hagiolater, n. — hagiolatrous, adj.
1. the branch of literature comprising the lives and legends of the saints.
2. a biography or narrative of the life of a saint or saints.
3. a collection of such biographies. — hagiologist, n. — hagiologic, hagiological, adj.
an intense dislike for the saints and the holy.
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

saints

People who have died for the faith or who have been thought worthy of special honor and remembrance by the Church as examples to Christians, and in the Roman Catholic Church as mediators with God.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in classic literature ?
The emperor was anxious to see that famous temple of the Rotunda, called in ancient times the temple 'of all the gods,' but now-a-days, by a better nomenclature, 'of all the saints,' which is the best preserved building of all those of pagan construction in Rome, and the one which best sustains the reputation of mighty works and magnificence of its founders.
"Then this fame, these favours, these privileges, or whatever you call it," said Sancho, "belong to the bodies and relics of the saints who, with the approbation and permission of our holy mother Church, have lamps, tapers, winding-sheets, crutches, pictures, eyes and legs, by means of which they increase devotion and add to their own Christian reputation.
Yet the Lady Loring held the place stoutly, and on the second day the Socman was slain--by his own men, as some think--so that we were delivered from their hands; for which praise be to all the saints, and more especially to the holy Anselm, upon whose feast it came to pass.
Now order the ranks, and fling wide the banners, for our souls are God's and our bodies the king's, and our swords for Saint George and for England!"
"Madam," said Saint Peter, rising and approaching the wicket, "whence do you come?"
"Never mind, my good girl," the Saint said, compassionately.
I thank the good Saint Wilfred that he hath given me a pretty wit.
Saint Dunstan, Saint Dubric, Saint Winibald, Saint Winifred, Saint Swibert, Saint Willick, not forgetting Saint Thomas a Kent, and my own poor merits to speed, I defy every devil of them, come cut and long tail.
He never went about otherwise than surrounded by a small court of bishops and abbés of high lineage, gallant, jovial, and given to carousing on occasion; and more than once the good and devout women of Saint Germain d' Auxerre, when passing at night beneath the brightly illuminated windows of Bourbon, had been scandalized to hear the same voices which had intoned vespers for them during the day carolling, to the clinking of glasses, the bacchic proverb of Benedict XII., that pope who had added a third crown to the Tiara-- Bibamus papaliter .
These active beings flitted here and there like so many demons completing some unknown labor; these were the beggars of the Court of Miracles -- the agents of the giver of holy water in the Square of Saint Eustache, preparing barricades for the morrow.
Madame Defarge and monsieur her husband returned amicably to the bosom of Saint Antoine, while a speck in a blue cap toiled through the darkness, and through the dust, and down the weary miles of avenue by the wayside, slowly tending towards that point of the compass where the chateau of Monsieur the Marquis, now in his grave, listened to the whispering trees.
An old man, decorated with the cross of Saint Louis, now rose and proposed the health of King Louis XVIII.