saleable

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sale·a·ble

 (sā′lə-bəl)
adj.
Variant of salable.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

saleable

(ˈseɪləbəl) or

salable

adj
(Commerce) fit for selling or capable of being sold
ˌsaleaˈbility, ˈsaleableness ˌsalaˈbility, ˈsalableness n
ˈsaleably, ˈsalably adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.saleable - capable of being sold; fit for sale; "saleable at a low price"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

saleable

salable (US) [ˈseɪləbl] ADJvendible
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

saleable

salable [ˈseɪləbəl] adj [item, product, house] → vendablesale price n
(= reduced price) → prix m soldé
(= selling price) → prix m de vente
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

saleable

, (US) salable
adj (= marketable)absatzfähig; skillvermarktbar; artist, ideagut verkäuflich; (= in saleable condition)verkäuflich; not in a saleable conditionnicht zum Verkauf geeignet
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

saleable

salable [ˈseɪləbl] adjvendibile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
All that is needed for the emergence of media of exchange is the existence of a different degree of marketability of the different goods brought to market: "The theory of money necessarily presupposes a theory of the saleableness of goods" (2) (Menger 2009, 21; cf.
Finally, it must have some kind of "intrinsic value," increasing what the economist Carl Menger called the "saleableness" of money.
His argument centered on the notion of marketability, or saleableness: (9) goods have a variable degree of marketability (Menger 1871 [1994], pp.