sally lunn


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sal·ly lunn

 (săl′ē lŭn′)
n.
A somewhat sweet bread leavened with yeast.

[After Sally Lunn, 18th-century British baker.]

Sally Lunn

(lʌn)
n
(Cookery) a flat round cake made from a sweet yeast dough, usually served hot
[C19: said to be named after an 18th-century English baker who invented it]

sal′ly lunn′

(lʌn)

n. (sometimes caps.)
a loaf cake or tea bun, made with yeast and slightly sweetened.
[1770–80; allegedly named after a woman who sold them in Bath, England, in the late 18th century]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sally Lunn - a flat round slightly sweet teacake usually served hot
teacake - any of various small cakes or cookies often served with tea
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
He congratulated himself that he had formed the plan of going to see Miss Sally Lunn this afternoon, and that, as a consequence, he had brought with him these propitiatory delicacies: he was certainly a lucky fellow; indeed, it was always likely Providence should be fonder of him than of other apprentices, and since he WAS to be interrupted, why, an idiot was preferable to any other sort of witness.
Toto and Billina followed behind them, behaving very well, and a little way down the street they came to a handsome residence where Aunt Sally Lunn lived.
As American as the Stars and Stripes, the burger is 100 percent US prime beef, tucked into a Sally Lunn bun, a bread that originated in Bath, England, but became popular in the United States during its colonial period.
After my first stop at the Roman baths, I meandered around cobbled lanes to the world famous Sally Lunn's Historic Eating House, dating from 1482.
She did me a Sally Lunn cake which is like a massive iced bun with loads of fruit in it and the icing didn't drip.
The Sally Lunn buns (a type of teacake) have long been baked in Bath and are served in many cafes.
ROYAL PATRON, who has been crying out for a step up in trip, is napped to win the Sally Lunn Fillies' Handicap (4.00) at Bath today, writes Matthew Doyle.
The hardships and heartaches of war (Jackson and two of her stepsons were killed and another stepson was maimed), the constant struggle with ill health, especially with poor hearing and ever deteriorating eyesight, and the long and spirited effort to compose poetry and write criticism in the midst of the constant interruptions associated with perpetual household duties (on occasion she had to give up the composition of a sonnet in order to make "Sally Lunn") are dealt with sympathetically but in a straightforward fashion.
Sally Lunn's, which featured in the Great British Bake Off last year, is known for its Bath buns, and it's surprise that this 'world-famous eating house' is a magnet for tourists.
To Oxford Street we'd merrily go, straight to Jo Lyons for cheese on toast and a famous Sally Lunn bun.
Attractions - the Roman Baths, Jane Austen Centre - Jane lived here for several years - Sally Lunn's Refreshment House and Thermae Bath Spa.