salmonellosis


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Related to salmonellosis: salmonella, shigellosis

sal·mo·nel·lo·sis

 (săl′mə-nĕ-lō′sĭs)
n. pl. sal·mo·nel·lo·ses (-sēz′)
Infection with salmonella bacteria of serotypes other than those that cause typhoid and paratyphoid fever, characterized in humans by fever, diarrhea, and vomiting and usually caused by ingestion of contaminated food. Symptoms in animals include enteritis and septicemia, but many infected animals display no symptoms.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

salmonellosis

(ˌsælmənɛˈləʊsɪs)
n
(Pathology) food poisoning caused by ingestion of a salmonella bacterium
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sal•mo•nel•lo•sis

(ˌsæl mə nlˈoʊ sɪs)

n.
food poisoning caused by consumption of food contaminated with salmonella bacteria.
[1910–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

salmonellosis

an illness caused by food tainted with certain species of salmonella bacteria.
See also: Poison
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.salmonellosis - a kind of food poisoning caused by eating foods contaminated with Salmonella typhimurium
food poisoning, gastrointestinal disorder - illness caused by poisonous or contaminated food
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
salmonelose

salmonellosis

[ˌsælməneˈləʊsɪs] Nsalmonelosis f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sal·mo·nel·lo·sis

n. salmonelosis, infección causada por ingestión de comida contaminada por bacterias del género Salmonela.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

salmonellosis

n salmonelosis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
To determine the association between reptile ownership and salmonellosis, Ackman (1995) reviewed New York State salmonella case reports and conducted a matched case control study.
Salmonellosis is one of the principal foodborne bacterial zoonoses throughout the world (Berndt and Methner, 2004).
Focal salmonellosis of soft tissues is relatively uncommon accounting for 6-12 percent of all focal salmonella infections.
An outbreak of salmonellosis in wild passerines caused mass mortality of Eurasian tree sparrows (Passer montanus) in Hokkaido, Japan, 2005-2006; however, the etiology was poorly understood.
It is caused by bacteria salmonellosis that lasts four up to seven days.
However, the prevalence of typhoid fever, salmonellosis, acute dysentery, acute intestinal diseases, bacterial meningitis, measles, typhoid fever, whooping cough, mononucleosis, rubella, scarlet fever, chickenpox, mumps is reportedly on the rise.
The test kit helps food processors and other parties detect Salmonella and consequently prevent salmonellosis. The kit is now validated by the AFNOR Certification for all human foods and environmental samples.
evaluated the 175 cases of salmonellosis in children less than five years of age that occurred from January 2010 through December 2013.
In this long study of one year a total of 744/2029 cases of diarrhea were identified which revealed an overall prevalence of diarrhea in goats to be 36.7% and salmonellosis 0.1% with the help of commercially available API 20E kits.
In another precautionary measure, the stocks of food suspected of being infected with salmonellosis bacteria have also been destroyed.
Despite an increasing incidence of extraintestinal salmonellosis in the past decades, a clinical practitioner must maintain a high index of suspicion for rare locations, such as the parotid gland, after uncomplicated bacteremia accompanying enterocolitis.
It added that funds provided for member states in the past had resulted in a continuous decrease in the number of cases of diseases, such as salmonellosis and transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, known as BSE.