salt of the earth


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salt

 (sôlt)
n.
1. A usually whitish crystalline solid, chiefly sodium chloride, used extensively in ground or granulated form as a food seasoning and preservative. Also called common salt, table salt.
2. An ionic chemical compound formed by replacing all or part of the hydrogen ions of an acid with metal ions or other cations.
3. salts Any of various mineral salts used as laxatives or cathartics.
4. salts Smelling salts.
5. often salts Epsom salts.
6. An element that gives flavor or zest.
7. Sharp lively wit.
8. Informal A sailor, especially when old or experienced.
9. A saltcellar.
adj.
1. Containing or filled with salt: a salt spray; salt tears.
2. Having a salty taste or smell: breathed the salt air.
3. Preserved in salt or a salt solution: salt mackerel.
4.
a. Flooded with seawater.
b. Found in or near such a flooded area: salt grasses.
tr.v. salt·ed, salt·ing, salts
1. To add, treat, season, or sprinkle with salt.
2. To cure or preserve by treating with salt or a salt solution.
3. To provide salt for (deer or cattle).
4. To add zest or liveliness to: salt a lecture with anecdotes.
5. To give an appearance of value to by fraudulent means, especially to place valuable minerals in (a mine) for the purpose of deceiving.
Phrasal Verbs:
salt away
To put aside; save.
salt out
To separate (a dissolved substance) by adding salt to the solution.
Idioms:
salt of the earth
1. A person or group considered as embodying simplicity and moral integrity.
2. Archaic A person or group considered the best or most worthy part of society.
worth (one's) salt
Efficient and capable.

[Middle English, from Old English sealt; see sal- in Indo-European roots.]

SALT

 (sôlt)
abbr.
Strategic Arms Limitation Talks
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

salt′ of the earth′


n.
an individual or group considered to embody the noblest human qualities.
[1350–1400; Middle English; after Matthew 5:13]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"How sad that so justly famous a satirist should mar his work by ridicule of people with long noses - who are the salt of the earth!"
Ratignolle was one of those men who are called the salt of the earth. His cheerfulness was unbounded, and it was matched by his goodness of heart, his broad charity, and common sense.
These are rare souls; they are the salt of the earth. But I don't mean to be invidious; the marrying people are often very nice."
I use heaps of postage stamps, pay the expenses of many indifferent lecturers, defray the cost of printing reams of pamphlets and hand-bills which hail the laborer flatteringly as the salt of the earth, write and edit a little socialist journal, and do what lies in my power generally.
To be sure, the Wades were never spoken of as "happy." They were invariably alluded to as "good folks," "true blue," "solid people," "ideal husband and wife," or "salt of the earth."
Jamie is the salt of the earth, Bootle-born and brought up.
My thanks to him and all those lovely Liverpudlians on the coach whoa re the salt of the earth.
But do not worry, we are in the Capital of Culture,full of loveable, comic salt of the earth characters .
"These lads really are the salt of the earth. Of course we will be chatting about the lads who went to
DAYLIGHT Robbery (Thursday, ITV) is about four Essex girls, hearts of gold, salt of the earth etc, who turn to crime when they find themselves down on their luck and up to their neck in cliches.
THERE is an old saying that scousers are the salt of the earth.
Ninety nine of the people of Sparrowhall are the salt of the earth.