salvation

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Related to salvational: Salvation Army

sal·va·tion

 (săl-vā′shən)
n.
1.
a. Preservation or deliverance from destruction, difficulty, or evil.
b. A source, means, or cause of such preservation or deliverance.
2. Theology
a. Deliverance from the power or penalty of sin; redemption.
b. In religions such as Hinduism and Buddhism, deliverance from the cycle of rebirth and suffering.
c. The agent or means that brings about such deliverance.

[Middle English savacioun, from Old French sauvacion, from Late Latin salvātiō, salvātiōn-, from salvātus, past participle of salvāre, to save; see salvage.]

sal·va′tion·al adj.

salvation

(sælˈveɪʃən)
n
1. the act of preserving or the state of being preserved from harm
2. a person or thing that is the means of preserving from harm
3. (Theology) Christianity deliverance by redemption from the power of sin and from the penalties ensuing from it
4. (Theology) Christian Science the realization that Life, Truth, and Love are supreme and that they can destroy such illusions as sin, death, etc
[C13: from Old French sauvacion, from Late Latin salvātiō, from Latin salvātus saved, from salvāre to save1]
salˈvational adj

sal•va•tion

(sælˈveɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of saving or protecting from harm, risk, loss, etc.
2. the state of being so saved or protected: the company's salvation from bankruptcy.
3. a source, cause, or means of being saved or protected from harm, risk, etc.
4. Theol. deliverance from the power and penalty of sin; redemption.
[1175–1225; Middle English salvatio(u)n, earlier sa(u)vaciun, sauvacion (< Old French sauvacion) < Late Latin salvātiō=salvā(re) to save1 + Latin -tiō -tion]
sal•va′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.salvation - (theology) the act of delivering from sin or saving from evilsalvation - (theology) the act of delivering from sin or saving from evil
deliverance, rescue, saving, delivery - recovery or preservation from loss or danger; "work is the deliverance of mankind"; "a surgeon's job is the saving of lives"
remission of sin, absolution, remittal, remission - the act of absolving or remitting; formal redemption as pronounced by a priest in the sacrament of penance
spiritual rebirth, conversion, rebirth - a spiritual enlightenment causing a person to lead a new life
atonement, expiation, propitiation - the act of atoning for sin or wrongdoing (especially appeasing a deity)
theology, divinity - the rational and systematic study of religion and its influences and of the nature of religious truth
2.salvation - a means of preserving from harm or unpleasantness; "tourism was their economic salvation"; "they turned to individualism as their salvation"
means, way, agency - how a result is obtained or an end is achieved; "a means of control"; "an example is the best agency of instruction"; "the true way to success"
3.salvation - the state of being saved or preserved from harm
safety - the state of being certain that adverse effects will not be caused by some agent under defined conditions; "insure the safety of the children"; "the reciprocal of safety is risk"
4.salvation - saving someone or something from harm or from an unpleasant situation; "the salvation of his party was the president's major concern"
deliverance, rescue, saving, delivery - recovery or preservation from loss or danger; "work is the deliverance of mankind"; "a surgeon's job is the saving of lives"

salvation

noun
1. saving, help, rescue, recovery, restoration, salvage, redemption, deliverance those whose marriages are beyond salvation
saving loss, ruin, doom, condemnation, downfall
2. lifeline, escape, relief, preservation I consider books my salvation.
Quotations
"Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling" Bible: Philippians

salvation

noun
Extrication from danger or confinement:
Translations
إنْقاذخَلاص
spása
frelseredning
üdvösség
björg, òaî sem bjargarsáluhjálp, frelsun
glābiņšglābšanapestīšana
günahtan kurtarmakurtuluş

salvation

[sælˈveɪʃən]
A. Nsalvación f
B. CPD Salvation Army NEjército m de Salvación

salvation

[sælˈveɪʃən] n
(religious)salut m
(= rescue) → salut m
I consider books to be my salvation → Je considère que je dois mon salut aux livres.
to be the salvation of sth/sb → sauver qch/qn

salvation

n (= act of saving)Rettung f; (= state of being saved also, esp Rel)Heil nt; he found salvation in the Churcher fand sein Heil in der Kirche; he found salvation in his workdie Arbeit war seine Rettung; the path to salvationder Weg des Heils; you were/that was my salvationdu warst/das war meine Rettung; everyone has to work out his own salvationjeder muss für sein eigenes Heil sorgen

salvation

[sælˈveɪʃn] nsalvezza

salvation

(sӕlˈveiʃən) noun
1. in religion, the freeing of a person from sin or the saving of his soul.
2. the cause, means, or act of saving. This delay was the salvation of the army.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most comprehensive study of George Eliot's religiosity concludes that "the emphasis on physical suffering, blood, and death in the hymnology and rhetoric of both High and Low Church Evangelicalism" was absent from Eliot's early letters, and thus "Christianity was not for the young believer [Eliot] a salvational or redemptive religion.
On the issue of good works, Coronaeus's traditional Catholic position strikes the golden chord between the Calvinist Curtius, who denies the salvational role of good works, and Toralba, who falls prey to Pelagianism.
Whereas Wells sought to salvage from the chaos of the First World War an epistemological insight of how the world can be set right again for the cause of "common peace and prosperity," Chang evinces a powerful cognitive skepticism if any such salvational knowledge can be gained.
Additionally, the converts often encountered reluctance or hesitation on the part of their former co-religionists to readmit them into the community, as the latter tended to question their sincerity (see the Geonic response below) and salvational status.
It has often been argued that the 1967 war marked a critical turning point in Arab cultural history: It freed Arabs of their belief in the salvational power of the postcolonial state, a progressive narrative of history, and the definition of the human subject as a sovereign and able figure (see Abu Rabi'; Kassab).
Drawing on "Urtheil und Seyn," Trop demonstrates how such unstable moments of transition are characterized by a kind of modal reversibility, allowing a seemingly contingent, even violent, event, such as the French Revolution, to be imaginatively recast as part of Christian salvational history and thus imbued with meaning as somehow necessary.
Kohlmann argues that the "intensity" with which they "discussed the notion of artistic 'sincerity' emanated in part from Richards's writing, where it was linked to a belief in poetry's salvational powers" (55).
Christofias thanked the Russian leadership for its "selfless and constant support, which is so salvational for Cyprus".
Certainly religious "insanity" seems to fall into a least three categories: (1) apocalyptic despair (Millerism, for example), which can overlap with or cause (2) salvational melancholy (my term), and (3) demonomania (whereby a person thinks she is possessed by demons or is otherwise under the influence of Satan).
Certainly, it is noticeable enough in Strong Motion, but at the end of that novel Franzen introduces the crucial salvational elements around which he articulates a metanarrative, that of his own literary conversion, by means of which he justifies his politico-literary evolution through the vicissitudes of his characters.
However, he has abiding faith in the salvational purpose of God.
The justifications for this distinction range from the salvational (liberation from elitist or terroristic aesthetic strictures in favor of a new "openness") to the apocalyptic (the death of French culture, literature, thought; the decline of the modernist literary ethos; the victory of the late-capitalist culture industry); but whether adopting a celebratory or an elegiac tone, such proclamations almost always define contemporary literature in opposition to the nouveau roman or to the theoretical currents of the 1950s-1970s.