samely

samely

(ˈseɪmlɪ)
adj
monotonous
References in periodicals archive ?
Miguel assumes that what he experiences when he touches Lacey is normal perception (to be samely abled!
Samely, yield of tomato plants was positively influenced by bacterial inducers at significant levels (Table 4).
Not that the former triad has been undone, but it has been applied by Augustine to say what memory, intellect, and will are indifferently, that is, what they are in themselves (and Augustine avers--all three are indistinctively and samely one life, one mind, and one substance), while memory, intellect and will as such, that is, as differing designations are said to describe the mutual relational aspect of the three inside the mind (see Hadot 1962:428, Pintaric 1983:57-61, Schindler 1965:201ff.).
I stood with millions outside of the nation's capitol building, our hearts beating samely, to witness the inauguration of the nation's first African American president.
Enraged by the cowardice of his allies, Menelaus himself decides to accept Hector's challenge, but first imprecates his daunted companions with the wish, But might all of you be turned to water and earth--each of you sitting there in one [same] spot [authi], spiritless, utterly [literally, autos, "samely"] inglorious.
BY ALEXANDER SAMELY. Oxford: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2002.
The title of Alexander Samely's book gives little indication that its primary aim is to explain the mishnaic approach to Scripture in terms of modern critical studies of language.
It is not easy, however, to give modern language definition to every aspect of mishnaic interpretation, although Samely is innovative in developing a particular terminology of his own, which he has done remarkably well.
Although technically correct, Samely makes a very wide use of the term.
Samely, along with other scholars, tends to regard these as later additions to the Mishna, but indeed they are integral to the text.
Samely (Journal of Semitic Studies, Supplement 12, 2000): 149-62.