samsaric


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

samsaric

(səmˈsɑːrɪk)
adj
of or relating to samsara
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
We cause the world to revolve, and ourselves to turn ceaselessly within it in the samsaric wheel.
She ends on the note of the emphasis in Buddhism on the middle way, and usefully points out that this middle way allows us to think about the samsaric and nibbanic along a line of continuity.
Here laughter is accompanied with allowing oneself to be indulged in the sensual pleasures of the samsaric world, but as we have just seen in the Buddha's own case, laughter does not have to be so accompanied, as the Buddha himself laughs.
According to the Vinayavibhanga, Udrayana attains arhatship before his execution, and thus his death marks the end of his samsaric existence.
as I bid farewell to them, I pray "May your journey across the Samsaric Ocean be a short one until Nihal, you attain the bliss of Nirvana and until Joy, you find comfort in the arms of a loving Jesus.
Passion is all that associates or connects individuals with the samsaric (earthly) world of suffering.
In Blakean terms, one of these invincible laws might be formulated thus: oppression is followed by frustration, which, reaching critical mass, turns into revolution; by revolution what is toppled is the oppressive order, but the initial revolutionary impulse tends to slip or slide into a new oppressive order: whenever this slip (quick process) or slide (slow process) takes place, the pendular process will repeat, ad infinitum, in a samsaric oscillating cycle without end, making up what we call the pendulum of history.
It is also a living testimony to the pilgrims who ambulate this holy land, a circumstantiation of their ardent faith, and of their desire to be free from the samsaric cycles and of the karma that perpetually proples and nourishes the Dharma Path of the earth's ever-recurrent planetary rounds.
I took on the ethical vows, I became completely nauseated at the prison of the samsaric world, and so became a monk!
And The Dharma is visible in the contingent and dichotomous unfurling of the samsaric swirl that it, The Dharma minutely indexes.
Dukkha, as set forth in the First Noble Truth, translates roughly as the "suffering" or "dissatisfaction" which traps us in the samsaric cycle of rebirth and prevents us from attaining nirvana: "Birth is dukkha, aging is dukkha, death is dukkha; sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief, & despair are dukkha; association with the unbeloved is dukkha; separation from the loved is dukkha; not getting what is wanted is dukkha" ("Dukkha").
Like the thief crucified beside Christ who recognizes his guilt at the final moment, deliverance in the Bar-do'i-thos-grol is attainable for anyone regardless of their past, and here even possible after death, or in the next samsaric life.