sancai


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sancai

(ˈsænkaɪ)
n
(Ceramics) a colourful glaze in Chinese pottery
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The sancai wares of Tang Dynasty China explore a breakdown of spotted pattern in yellow and green glaze sliding as they melt over a swollen belly.
Hsu analyzes ceramic statues representing the 16 luohans, Buddhist "worthy ones" created in Yixian, China and highly glazed in the bright colors of the sancai (tri-color) scheme.
It showcased an array of precious artefacts that included bronze works dating back to the Western Zhou dynasty, bricks from the Qin dynasty, tiles from the Han dynasty, Tang Sancai and Silk Road coins from Xi'an, as well as paintings, ethnic costumes, agar wood, tea and traditional decorations from India.
In an attempt to support Li Sancai (?-1623) to be the candidate for grand secretary (one of the most important posts at imperial court) in around 1609, Gu Xiancheng called his colleagues' attention to the local people's sentiments and spontaneous activities in support of Li Sancai, when Li was about to leave the locality where he had served as a local official.
(97.) Photo: Ming Dynasty torture implements: wooden manacles, finger press, ankle press, fetters, "box-bed," interrogation baton, light and heavy flogging sticks, cangue, prisoner's card, restraining board, (Wang Qi (ed), Sancai Tuhui), reprinted in Brook ET al., supra note 72, at 45.
This reduction of tea production to quasi-spontaneous cosmological processes predicated on a traditional tri-partite (sancai) division of the world into heaven, earth and the human (tian, di, ren) invites us to think further about how the human (ren) figures in this scheme, and in representations of Taiwanese tea culture more generally.
The sale is comprised of 160 lots, the large majority of which include Sancai burial figurals from the Tang Dynasty.
COLLECTORS of oriental ceramics will recognise the style of decoration used on this pair of small vases as being a traditional Chinese three-colour glaze known as "sancai".
The hallmark of Tang tomb wares is the sancai, or three-colour, lead-silicate glazes.